copy


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blot (one's) copy book

To tarnish, damage, or ruin one's reputation by behaving badly or committing some mistake or social transgression. Refers to a child's copy book, the blotting (staining with ink) of which ruins one's work. Primarily heard in UK. The local councilor blotted his copy book when it came to light that he had accepted bribes to allow unregulated development projects to go ahead. I really blotted my copy book when I spilled my drink on the visiting dignitary last night.
See also: blot, book, copy

carbon copy

1. A copy of a document that is made by placing a sheet of carbon paper under the original so that the print gets transferred from the original to the sheet of paper below it. Carbon copies are largely obsolete but are still used in some cases for receipts. Could you please make a carbon copy of that invoice? I need it for my records.
2. To include additional recipients on an email message that is intended for, or directed to, another person. Often abbreviated as "cc." Please carbon copy me on that email to Janice. I want her to know I am aware of the situation.
3. A person or thing that closely resembles someone or something else in looks or attributes. Even though they were born several years apart, Darren is a carbon copy of his brother. They have the same gait, mannerisms, and hairstyle.
See also: carbon, copy

copy down

To write something exactly as it is said or written in another place or source. A noun or pronoun can be used between "copy" and "down" or after "down." Did you copy down the instructions the boss gave for this project? Be sure to copy your homework down—it's written on the blackboard.
See also: copy, down

copy out (by hand)

To write something by hand (as opposed to typing). A noun or pronoun can be used between "copy" and "out." My grandmother used to copy out all of her recipes by hand on index cards.
See also: copy, out

copy (something) out of (something)

To write something exactly as it appeared in another source. My grandmother used to copy all of her recipes out of cookbooks and onto index cards.
See also: copy, of, out

a copy

Each; apiece. Ugh, are tickets to that concert really $200 a copy?
See also: copy

copy something down (from someone or something)

to copy onto paper what someone says; to copy onto paper what one reads. Please copy this down from Tony. Ted copied down the directions from the invitation. Jane copied the recipe down from the cookbook.
See also: copy, down

copy something out (by hand)

to copy something in handwriting. I have to copy this out again. I lost the first copy. Please copy out this article for me.
See also: copy, out

copy something out of something

 and copy something out
to copy something onto paper from a book or document. Did you copy this out of a book? I did not copy this paper or any part of it out of anything. I copied out most of it.
See also: copy, of, out

carbon copy

A person or thing that closely resembles another, as in Our grandson is a carbon copy of his dad. Originally this term meant a copy of a document made by using carbon paper. The linguistic transfer to other kinds of duplicate survived the demise of carbon paper (replaced by photocopiers, computer printers, and other more sophisticated devices). [c. 1870]
See also: carbon, copy

a carbon copy

COMMON If one person or thing is a carbon copy of another, the two people or things are identical, or very similar. Hugh was a carbon copy of his father, Edward; both had the same blond hair and easy charm. The town, almost a carbon copy of Gualdo, is best known for its mineral waters. Note: A carbon copy of a document is an exact copy of it which is made using carbon paper.
See also: carbon, copy

carbon copy

a person or thing identical or very similar to another.
The expression comes from the idea of an exact copy of written or typed material made by using carbon paper.
See also: carbon, copy

a ˌcarbon ˈcopy

a person or thing that is exactly or extremely like another: The recent robberies in Leeds are a carbon copy of those that have occurred in Halifax over the last few months.
A carbon copy is a copy of a document, letter, etc. made by placing carbon paper (= thin paper with a dark substance on one side) between two sheets of paper.
See also: carbon, copy

copy down

v.
To write something exactly as it is said or written somewhere else; transcribe something: I'll be out tomorrow, so please copy down what the teacher says. Copy the instructions down so you don't forget them.
See also: copy, down

a copy

n. a piece, as with an item produced. We sell the toy at $14 a copy.
See also: copy
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, some scenarios are not compatible with incremental image copy backups.
Moore said he has sold 75,000 copies of DVD Copy Plus since July.
You'll get copy sooner, and it will be more consistent with established corporate messages if you give the writer current backgrounders, news releases, product collateral and presentations.
Asynchronous replication, like synchronous replication, creates an exact copy of the local data on a remote system.
It has not affected my business whatsoever," says Franklin, whose company is a quick printer and copy center.
The organization need not make available any application pending with the IRS or any application filed before July 15, 1987, unless the organization possessed a copy of the application on that date.
For big money, I'll make a trip for eye-to-eye, hard copy, indelible ink and all that
Mirroring is used for many mission-critical applications and it is the fastest way to recover data from a device or subsystem failure, since restore operations can occur in no more than a few seconds by switching to a mirrored copy.
The microphone input allows the user to replace the soundtrack originating on the 8mm tape so that the VHS copy has narration, sound effects, music or whatever.
Under certain limited circumstances, a lawful owner of a copy of a computer program can make another copy or adaptation, unless an agreement specifically prohibits it.
A snapshot is, after all, just a copy of data, which is exactly what a backup is.
Some size and contrast changes are possible, but the ability to modify the image as it transfers from the original to the copy is very limited.