coon


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coon eye(s)

1. Discoloration in the area surrounding the eye(s) due to an accumulation of blood, as caused by periorbital ecchymosis (i.e., "black eye(s)"). A colloquial shortening of "raccoon eyes," likened to the black patches around the eyes of a raccoon. He had a pretty bad coon eye after the bully punched him in the face. I had coon eyes for several days after my car accident.
2. A discoloration immediately around—and especially under—the eye(s) due to the smearing of dark-colored makeup. A colloquial shortening of "raccoon eyes," likened to the black patches around the eyes of a raccoon. She wouldn't have such a problem with coon eyes if she didn't wear so much makeup to begin with! Whenever I cry, it causes my makeup to run and give me coon eyes.
3. A discoloration immediately around—and especially under—the eye(s) due to prolonged fatigue or lack of sleep. A colloquial shortening of "raccoon eyes," likened to the black patches around the eyes of a raccoon. I must not sleep very soundly because I always have these coon eyes when I wake up.
See also: coon

a coon's age

An exceptionally long period of time. Based on the folk belief that raccoons (shortened colloquially to "coons") had a longer-than-average lifespan. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. It will take a coon's age to get all this work finished! I haven't been on a vacation in a coon's age.
See also: age

for a coon's age

For an exceptionally long period of time. Based on the folk belief that raccoons (shortened colloquially to "coons") have a longer-than-average lifespan. I could work on this project for a coon's age, and I still wouldn't get it all done! I haven't been on a vacation for a coon's age.
See also: age

gone coon

slang, obsolete Any person or thing that is in a position of certain death, failure, or ruin. From the image of a raccoon (commonly shortened to "coon") being hunted for its fur. Primarily heard in US. He said his business would be a gone coon if the bank doesn't approve his loan.
See also: coon, gone

ace boom-boom

One's close friend. Oh, I'm sure he invited Dave—that's his ace boom-boom.
See also: ace

ace boon-coon

A reclaimed term in the black community for one's close friend. However, it is potentially offensive due to "coon" being a racial slur. Oh, I'm sure he invited Dave—that's his ace boon-coon.
See also: ace

in a coon's age

 and in a month of Sundays
Rur. in a very long time. (The coon is a raccoon.) How are you? I haven't seen you in a coon's age. I haven't had a piece of apple pie this good in a coon's age.
See also: age

coon's age

Also, a dog's age. A very long time, as in I haven't seen Sam in a coon's age, or It's been a dog's age since I went to the ballpark. The first phrase rests on the mistaken idea that raccoons ("coons") live a long time. The variant may reflect a similar assumption but the true origin is not known. [c. 1835] Also see donkey's years.
See also: age

gone coon, a

Also, a gone goose. A person in a hopeless situation, one who is doomed; a dead duck. For example, When he passed me, I knew I was a gone goose. These terms have survived such synonyms as gone chick, gone beaver, gone horse, and gone gander. Stephen Crane used the first in The Red Badge of Courage (1894): "I'm a gone coon this first time." [Slang; early 1800s]
See also: gone

for (or in) a coon's age

a very long time. North American informal
1951 William Styron Lie Down in Darkness I haven't seen him in a coon's age.
See also: age

a gone coon

a person or thing in desperate straits or as good as dead. US informal
Coon in these idioms is an informal abbreviation of raccoon . Raccoons were hunted for their fur, and a gone coon was one that had been cornered so that it could not escape.
See also: coon, gone

ace boom-boom

and ace boon-coon
n. one’s good and loyal friend. (Black. Ace boon-coon is not as common as the first entry and is objected to because of coon.) Hey girlfriend, you are my ace boom-boom. Where is my old ace boon-coon, bro?
See also: ace

ace boon-coon

verb
See also: ace

coon's age, a

A long time. An American expression from the first half of the nineteenth century, it is based on the mistaken idea that raccoons (or “coons”) are long-lived. They are not, but their fur, widely used from colonial times, is sturdy and long-lasting. An early example appears in black dialect in Southern Sketches (1860): “This child haint had much money in a coon’s age.”
References in periodicals archive ?
The bench show for coon dogs at 7:00 Saturday evening is a highlight of the "chase." This judged segment involves the owner/person in charge walking his or her dog, displaying its features on a bench, and choosing the winners of certain categories.
The property, in the southwest quadrant of Highways 610 and 47, had previously been owned by Forest Lake-based Gaughan Cos., according to Coon Rapids Economic Development Coordinator Matt Brown.
In August Coon was accepted into the Foreign Service.
When Coon contacted Seterus, a representative allegedly told her to ignore the cure notice and not make any further payments until her application to assume the loan was completed.
In addition to Henig and Coon, other new faces joining the show are Natalie Paul and Hannah Gross.
Shortly before World War I began in 1914, coon songs had more or less disappeared from Tin Pan Alley.
"(My costume) changes, it grows every year," Coon said.
Japan's Foreign Ministry said Coon visited the site of the former POW camp in Kosaka next to a now defunct copper mine where he was put to forced labor.
Small Business Administration cited Coon and Herrin's combination of business savvy, enticing employee perks, customer service and well-organized books.
One night, as Coon watched and whimpered, the slave driver cat-hauled Juby, dragging a clawing tomcat across Juby's bare back.
The bills haven't been considered on the floor of Congress yet, Coon said, but they've received wide bipartisan support.
The new report, Coon said, suggests that embryonic stem cells and iPS cells are quite similar.
San Diego chancellor Rodrigo Valdivia confirmed to NCR that Coon "did request remission of her censure to Bishop [Robert] Brom" of San Diego.
WASHINGTON: They became good buddies during the war, the young American soldier and his invaluable Iraqi translator, an easygoing guy who could spot dangers in the shadows and calm jittery nerves in the streets.AaWhen it was time to go home, Joey Coon, then an Army National Guard sergeant, set up an e-mail account for his translator, Bandar Hasan.