cookie cutter

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cookie cutter

1. noun A tool used to cut dough into shapes for cookies. I used a heart-shaped cookie cutter for these Valentine's cookies—aren't they adorable?
2. adjective Identical to other things. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I want a unique house, not one of those cookie-cutter boxes that looks like every other one on the block.
See also: cookie, cutter
References in periodicals archive ?
It has, however, produced a positive impact on participating officers that was sorely lacking with previous cookie-cutter community policing efforts.
Cookie-cutter regulations that keep the forest industry in check were never intended for operations the size of most family forests.
With small fins and relatively little muscle, the foot-long cookie-cutter shark has the classic traits of a sit-and-wait predator: It simply doesn't have the power to chase down prey.
However, the Oak Brook, Ill., chain is facing major marketing challenges that bear watching by retailers who think they can cookie-cutter their way to success.
RELATED ARTICLE: FIGURE 4 Recipe for Cookie-Cutter Gelatin
Unlike other cookie-cutter rap cliques in the business, Young L, Stunna, Uno, and B are products of their unique environment.
Essential to the developer's vision of producing a traditional urban neighborhood was avoiding a cookie-cutter similarity among so many residences.
Realize that life and people aren't cookie-cutter perfect; they do bad things and I feel it's interesting to examine the different ways people do act.
I think some choreographers get into a cookie-cutter mentality and have to identify with every dancer in their troupe.
For those well versed in TP, the Brazilian approach comes as a surprise, because it fails to adopt the arm's-length principle and instead promotes a "cookie-cutter" approach.
Human sexuality is not nearly as neat or tidy as we might have hoped, and our sexual appetites and behaviors do not fit into the cookie-cutter forms handed down from one generation to the next.
Pundits and bureaucrats alike agree that Hokkaido's dramatic natural assets have been squandered and that bland, cookie-cutter resorts dictated by developers 500 miles away in Tokyo are not the best way to attract tourists.
"This isn't a cookie-cutter operation," says Reuss.