cook (one's) goose

(redirected from cooked their goose)

cook (one's) goose

To interfere with, disrupt, or ruin something for someone. News of my involvement in this scandal will cook my goose for sure.
See also: cook, goose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cook someone's goose

Fig. to damage or ruin someone. I cooked my own goose by not showing up on time. Sally cooked Bob's goose for treating her the way he did.
See also: cook, goose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cook someone's goose

Ruin someone, upset someone's plans. For example, He thinks he'll get away with stealing my idea, but I'm going to cook his goose. The origin of this phrase has been lost, but there are numerous fanciful theories; one concerns a besieged town that displayed a goose to show it had enough food, causing the attackers to set it on fire. The first recorded use of this colloquial phrase was in 1851.
See also: cook, goose
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cook your goose

INFORMAL
If you cook your goose, you do something which causes trouble for you or spoils your chances of success. He's not going to get that promotion now — he's cooked his goose. Note: Something or someone can also cook someone else's goose. If any issue has cooked their goose at the next election, it is probably their position on taxes. Note: You can also say that your goose is cooked if you are in trouble or will certainly fail at something. We all thought our goose was cooked — we were going to be attacked by ground forces and there was nowhere to retreat. Note: There is a story that King Eric XIV of Sweden once arrived at a town to find that the people had hung a goose from a tree. This was intended as an insult, perhaps because geese were associated with stupidity. The King announced that he would `cook their goose', and his soldiers invaded the town and set fire to its main buildings. An alternative theory is that the expression refers to Aesop's fable of the goose which laid golden eggs: see the explanation at `kill the goose that lays the golden egg'.
See also: cook, goose
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cook someone's goose

spoil someone's plans; cause someone's downfall. informal
The underlying idea of this phrase seems to be that a goose was cherished and fattened up for a special occasion, and therefore to cook it prematurely meant to spoil the plans for a feast.
See also: cook, goose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌcook somebody’s ˈgoose

(informal) ruin somebody’s plans or chances of success: He thought that the police would never find him but when he saw the officer coming towards him he realized that his goose was finally cooked.
See also: cook, goose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cook (one's) goose

Slang
To ruin one's chances: The speeding ticket cooked his goose with his father. Her goose was cooked when she was caught cheating on the test.
See also: cook, goose
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cook someone's goose, to

To ruin someone’s undertaking or plan. There are numerous colorful theories about the origin of this term. According to one, the inhabitants of a besieged town in the sixteenth century hung out a goose to show their attackers they were not starving; the enraged enemies then set fire to the town and thus cooked the goose. According to another, the term comes from the fable about the goose that laid golden eggs, which, when the farmer killed it to obtain the gold inside, left him with nothing but a goose to cook. The earliest written records of the term date from the mid-nineteenth century, one being in a street ballad opposing the Pope’s appointment of a particular cardinal (“If they’ll come here we’ll cook their goose, the Pope and Cardinal Wiseman,” 1851).
See also: cook, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: