cook someone's goose, to

cook someone's goose

Fig. to damage or ruin someone. I cooked my own goose by not showing up on time. Sally cooked Bob's goose for treating her the way he did.
See also: cook, goose

cook someone's goose

Ruin someone, upset someone's plans. For example, He thinks he'll get away with stealing my idea, but I'm going to cook his goose. The origin of this phrase has been lost, but there are numerous fanciful theories; one concerns a besieged town that displayed a goose to show it had enough food, causing the attackers to set it on fire. The first recorded use of this colloquial phrase was in 1851.
See also: cook, goose

cook someone's goose

spoil someone's plans; cause someone's downfall. informal
The underlying idea of this phrase seems to be that a goose was cherished and fattened up for a special occasion, and therefore to cook it prematurely meant to spoil the plans for a feast.
See also: cook, goose

cook (one's) goose

Slang
To ruin one's chances: The speeding ticket cooked his goose with his father. Her goose was cooked when she was caught cheating on the test.
See also: cook, goose

cook someone's goose, to

To ruin someone’s undertaking or plan. There are numerous colorful theories about the origin of this term. According to one, the inhabitants of a besieged town in the sixteenth century hung out a goose to show their attackers they were not starving; the enraged enemies then set fire to the town and thus cooked the goose. According to another, the term comes from the fable about the goose that laid golden eggs, which, when the farmer killed it to obtain the gold inside, left him with nothing but a goose to cook. The earliest written records of the term date from the mid-nineteenth century, one being in a street ballad opposing the Pope’s appointment of a particular cardinal (“If they’ll come here we’ll cook their goose, the Pope and Cardinal Wiseman,” 1851).
See also: cook