convict of (something)

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convict of (something)

To be deem guilty of a crime. With all of the evidence against him, he'll surely be convicted of that crime.
See also: convict, of

convict someone of something

to pronounce someone guilty of something. In the end, they convicted her of theft. The police wanted to convict Max of the crime.
See also: convict, of
References in classic literature ?
Giles wanted was necessarily a trustworthy servant, and she had to make her choice of one among the convicts of good character, to be assigned to private service.
Superintendent Central Jail Macch Ishaque Zehri said that the jail authorities had set to execute convicts of a double murder case Ali Gul
90) In Kent and Townsend's The Convicts of the Eleanor (2002), and Maxwell-Stewart and Pybus's American Citizens, British Slaves (2002), trans-national perspectives binding the pre- and post-transportation experience of convicts brought maturity to labour history's long-running interest in political and radical protest.
Smith, Cargo of Women: Susannah Watson and the Convicts of the Princess Royal, UNSW Press, Sydney, 1988.
Townsend, The Convicts of the Eleanor, Merlin/Pluto Press, Sydney, 2002; C.
For instance, a concise but thorough study of the convicts of Van Diemen's Land by James Moore does not treat them as a group, but lumps them in with the urban English and Irish or the rural English, simply because 'There were very few Scots convicts and there was no justification for making a separate category for them'.
44) Naturally, many convicts of other nationalities also had reminders of home.
There is overall not much evidence amongst them of the Scottish 'labour aristocracy': for instance, a literacy rate for urban Scots convicts of 61 per cent, whilst significantly higher than the English and Irish, is too low to reflect the whole Scottish working class.
Moore, The Convicts of Van Diemen's Land 1840-1853, Hobart, 1976, p.
W)hen it is known that while convicts of both sexes are confined in the same yard, it is impossible for them to be restrained within the bounds of propriety, or their morals reformed; and from past experience, not only in our own State, but in others, one female prisoner is of more trouble than twenty males.
In 1882, however, concerned over the lack of any appropriate accommodations, Chester's penitentiary commissioners recommended the construction of an entirely separate female prison, asserting that "there is neither wisdom, economy, nor humanity in keeping female prisoners cooped up in the attic of one and basement of the other prison for male convicts of the State.