conviction


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Related to conviction: lack conviction

have the courage of (one's) convictions

To have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, but she had the courage of her conviction to refuse such an offer.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

courage of (one's) convictions

Strong faith or confidence in one's beliefs. Often used in the phrase "have the courage of one's convictions." I need to have the courage of my convictions any time I'm around my parents—they always try to dissuade me from pursuing a career as a screenwriter. I'm always impressed with Stella—nothing can shake the courage of her convictions in her crusade for social justice.
See also: conviction, courage, of

lack the courage of (one's) convictions

To not have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, and she accepted it because she lacked the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, lack, of

carry (a lot of) weight (with someone or something)

Fig. to be very influential with someone or some group of people. Your argument does not carry a lot of weight with me. The senator's testimony carried a lot of weight with the council.
See also: carry, weight

carry one's (own) weight

 and pull one's (own) weight
Fig. to do one's share; to earn one's keep. (The weight is the burden that is the responsibility of someone.) Tom, you must be more helpful around the house. We each have to carry our own weight. Bill, I'm afraid that you can't work here anymore. You just haven't been carrying your weight.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight (with someone)

Fig. to have influence with someone; [for an explanation] to amount to a good argument to use with someone. That carries a lot of weight with the older folks. What you say carries no weight with me.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of one's convictions

to have enough courage and determination to carry out one's goals. It's fine to have noble goals in life and to believe in great things. If you don't have the courage of your convictions, you'll never reach your goals. Jane was successful because she had the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry weight

Also, carry authority or conviction . Exert influence, authority, or persuasion, as in No matter what the President says, his words always carry weight. Shakespeare combined two of these expressions in Henry VIII (3:2): "Words cannot carry authority so weighty." [c. 1600]
See also: carry, weight

courage of one's convictions, have the

Behave according to one's beliefs. For example, Carl wouldn't give his best friend any of the test answers; he had the courage of his convictions . This expression is believed to have originated as a translation of the French le courage de son opinion ("the courage of his opinion"), dating from the mid-1800s and at first so used. By the late 1800s it had changed to the present form.
See also: courage, have, of

carry weight

COMMON If a person or their opinion carries weight, they are respected and are able to influence people. Not only do men talk more, but what they say often carries more weight. El Tiempo is Colombia's leading newspaper and its opinions carry considerable weight in the country.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

be influential or important.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of your convictions

act on your beliefs despite danger or disapproval.
1998 Times The knives were out for us and we had to have the courage of our convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry ˈweight

be important or able to influence somebody: His opinions carry very little weight with his manager.
See also: carry, weight

have/lack the courage of your conˈvictions

be/not be brave enough to do what you believe to be right: You say that cruelty to animals is wrong, so why not have the courage of your convictions and join our campaign?
See also: conviction, courage, have, lack, of

carry weight

verb
See also: carry, weight

courage of one's convictions, to have the

To act in accordance with one’s beliefs. The term may have originated in France since at first it was stated as the courage of his opinions (le courage de son opinion); it so appears in John Morley’s biography of Diderot (1878). A 1989 political cartoonist put an amusing twist on it in criticizing President George H.W. Bush’s changing stand on abortion: “It’s nice to see he has the courage of his elections” (Wasserman, Boston Globe, Nov. 9, 1989). See also put one's money where one's mouth is.
See also: courage, have, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The court also held that for the purposes of Article 63 (1) (h) of Constitution and Section 27 (2) (i) of Punjab Local Government Act, the portion of sentence actually served was of no relevance and the disqualification was attracted on the bases of conviction and sentence awarded as opposed to served.
Justice Ahsan observed that the issue in the case at hand was not whether the conviction of the appellant was for a crime involving moral turpitude or whether the court of competent jurisdiction had rendered the sentence.
Spurred by difficulties vacating convictions from prosecutions that involved officers from the former Gun Trace Task Force, agroup of prosecutors and criminal justice reform advocates are supporting legislation tocreate a new mechanism in the law.
"Unlike his claim relating to his drug conviction, Mr.
North Wales Police and Crime Commissioner Arfon Jones said recruiting people with convictions can have a positive impact on their businesses by giving them access to a new talent pool.
Accordingly, the 2009 conviction order for assault and battery of a family member in violation of Code 18.2-57.2, coupled with his statement that the incident involved his former spouse, established that Marshall had previously been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.
"Since a conviction is a criminal proceeding that is entirely separate from recovery efforts, Deguito's conviction only helps the retrieval indirectly by bolstering the civil forfeiture cases through which recovery efforts are coursed," the council said.
courts, but he or she can still be removed if the conviction meets the
The state used defendant's two prior domestic-violence convictions from December 2010 to enhance the charges.
The year-wise break-up of cases on Monday showed that during year 2014, 426 cases were disposed off, 333 convicted and 34 were acquitted with 91 per cent conviction rate.
The Howard say the best reduce reoffending to offer sentences They show a total of 13,527 people were jailed for the first time during 2016 for an indictable offence, despite having at least one previous conviction.
The Howard say the reduce to offer They show a total of 13,527 people were jailed for the first time during 2016 for an indictable offence, despite having at least one previous conviction.
There does not appear to be one single reason why conviction rates are on the rise again, but IAM RoadSmart surmises that a combination of targeted enforcement, increased electronic surveillance and a renewed focus on traffic policing after years of neglect may all be behind the increases.
Anwar has sought a declaration that his conviction by the Court of Appeal on March 7, 2014 was ultra vires the Federal Constitution and thus null and void.
Last week the Examiner reported that the ringleader Amere Singh Dhaliwal is appealing his life sentence, Zahid Hassan is appealing his convictions and Mohammed Kammer is appealing his sentence.