conviction


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Related to conviction: lack conviction
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have the courage of (one's) convictions

To have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, but she had the courage of her conviction to refuse such an offer.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

courage of (one's) convictions

Strong faith or confidence in one's beliefs. Often used in the phrase "have the courage of one's convictions." I need to have the courage of my convictions any time I'm around my parents—they always try to dissuade me from pursuing a career as a screenwriter. I'm always impressed with Stella—nothing can shake the courage of her convictions in her crusade for social justice.
See also: conviction, courage, of

lack the courage of (one's) convictions

To not have the confidence to act or behave in accordance with one's beliefs or ideologies, especially in the face of resistance, criticism, or persecution. The governor was presented with a bribe to help the corporation avoid regulation, and she accepted it because she lacked the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, lack, of

carry (a lot of) weight (with someone or something)

Fig. to be very influential with someone or some group of people. Your argument does not carry a lot of weight with me. The senator's testimony carried a lot of weight with the council.
See also: carry, weight

carry one's (own) weight

 and pull one's (own) weight
Fig. to do one's share; to earn one's keep. (The weight is the burden that is the responsibility of someone.) Tom, you must be more helpful around the house. We each have to carry our own weight. Bill, I'm afraid that you can't work here anymore. You just haven't been carrying your weight.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight (with someone)

Fig. to have influence with someone; [for an explanation] to amount to a good argument to use with someone. That carries a lot of weight with the older folks. What you say carries no weight with me.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of one's convictions

to have enough courage and determination to carry out one's goals. It's fine to have noble goals in life and to believe in great things. If you don't have the courage of your convictions, you'll never reach your goals. Jane was successful because she had the courage of her convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry weight

Also, carry authority or conviction . Exert influence, authority, or persuasion, as in No matter what the President says, his words always carry weight. Shakespeare combined two of these expressions in Henry VIII (3:2): "Words cannot carry authority so weighty." [c. 1600]
See also: carry, weight

courage of one's convictions, have the

Behave according to one's beliefs. For example, Carl wouldn't give his best friend any of the test answers; he had the courage of his convictions . This expression is believed to have originated as a translation of the French le courage de son opinion ("the courage of his opinion"), dating from the mid-1800s and at first so used. By the late 1800s it had changed to the present form.
See also: courage, have, of

carry weight

COMMON If a person or their opinion carries weight, they are respected and are able to influence people. Not only do men talk more, but what they say often carries more weight. El Tiempo is Colombia's leading newspaper and its opinions carry considerable weight in the country.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

be influential or important.
See also: carry, weight

have the courage of your convictions

act on your beliefs despite danger or disapproval.
1998 Times The knives were out for us and we had to have the courage of our convictions.
See also: conviction, courage, have, of

carry ˈweight

be important or able to influence somebody: His opinions carry very little weight with his manager.
See also: carry, weight

have/lack the courage of your conˈvictions

be/not be brave enough to do what you believe to be right: You say that cruelty to animals is wrong, so why not have the courage of your convictions and join our campaign?
See also: conviction, courage, have, lack, of

carry weight

verb
See also: carry, weight
References in periodicals archive ?
And, staggeringly, the analysis reveals that drink and drug driving convictions in Coventry have increased by 95% in one year alone.
At the time, Garsh said she was "compelled to follow binding precedent" in overturning the conviction.
There were also 47 convictions for dangerous driving from applicants while there were 29 convictions for grievous bodily harm disclosed in the information by the DBS.
Across Birmingham, there were 22 convictions for indecent assault on women aged 16 and over, and six indecent assaults on girls aged under 14.
Overall across the region there were 16 applicants with convictions for indecent assault on women over 16 and eight for indecent assaults on girls aged under 14.
According to separate data, meanwhile, applications made to Cardiff council for a taxi driver's licence between 2012 and 2015 included two with manslaughter convictions and 155 with assault or assault occasioning actual bodily harm convictions.
In A Jury of Her Peers: The Impact of the First Female Jurors on Criminal Convictions (NBER Working Paper No.
Figures obtained from the Ministry of Justice have revealed that between April 2010 and April 2014 there were 424 convictions under the Animal Welfare Act across the country.
The units spend a lot of time sorting through requests from the convicted parties, innocence projects and other sources to decide what to review, said Inger Chandler, chief of the Conviction Review Section at the Harris County District Attorney's Office in Houston.
Among the previous convictions revealed through the Disclosure and Barring Service for people applying for taxi licences were attempted intercourse with girl under 13 and gross indecency with a girl under 13 in Stockton, as well as attempted sexual intercourse without consent in the same area.
Tucked behind Section 1 of the act was a short section that allows Oregonians convicted of possessing, delivering or growing marijuana as teenagers to have their convictions set aside.
The overall conviction rate includes cases disposed of by way of trial, guilty plea, dismissal or nol pros (prosecutor's decision not to proceed after a charge has been filed).
The Manhattan order comprises the largest number of convictions ever vacated in New York since the statute was passed in 2010.
After seven years, a nurse does not have to declare to a new employer she has previously had a conviction.
The news comes after a London school unwittingly hired paedo William Vahey despite his conviction.