convenience


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Related to convenience: convenience goods, Convenience Sampling

at (one's) convenience

When one has the time to do something. No rush, you can fill out that paperwork at your convenience.
See also: convenience

at (one's) earliest convenience

As soon as one is able to do something. Please fill out that paperwork at your earliest convenience. Dan needs to call me at his earliest convenience.
See also: convenience, early

at someone's earliest convenience

as soon as it is possible for someone to do something. (This is also a polite way of saying immediately.) Please stop by my office at your earliest convenience. Bill, please have the oil changed at your earliest convenience.
See also: convenience, early

at one's convenience

Also, at one's earliest convenience. Whenever one wishes; also, as soon as one can. For example, Pick up the car any time, at your convenience, or We need that drawing very soon, so please finish it at your earliest convenience. The use of convenience in the sense of "ease" or "absence of trouble" dates from about 1700.
See also: convenience

marriage of convenience

a marriage concluded to achieve a practical purpose.
This expression was used by Joseph Addison in the early 18th century, translating the French mariage de convenance , which has itself been current in English since the mid 19th century.
1949 George Bernard Shaw Buoyant Billions The proportion of happy love marriages to happy marriages of convenience has never been counted.
See also: convenience, marriage, of

at somebody’s conˈvenience

(formal) at a time or a place which is suitable for somebody: Can you telephone me at your convenience to arrange a meeting?
See also: convenience

at your earliest conˈvenience

(written) as soon as possible: Please telephone at your earliest convenience.
See also: convenience, early
References in classic literature ?
Grant is most kind and obliging to me, and though he is really a gentleman, and, I dare say, a good scholar and clever, and often preaches good sermons, and is very respectable, I see him to be an indolent, selfish bon vivant, who must have his palate consulted in everything; who will not stir a finger for the convenience of any one; and who, moreover, if the cook makes a blunder, is out of humour with his excellent wife.
When Americans went abroad in 1820 there was something romantic, almost heroic in it, as compared with the perpetual ferryings of the present hour, when photography and other conveniences have annihilated surprise.
O yes; if it is for your happiness and worldly convenience.
Their hours of study were managed in much the same way; my judgment or convenience was never once consulted.
The man's punctuality depended on the convenience of his superiors employed at the office.
Let me hear what you think of this suggestion, at your earliest convenience.
The post to the south went out on the next day; and the early hour of the morning at which the messenger called for our letters made it a matter of ordinary convenience to write overnight.
Foot-passengers were mere pestering flies with an insane disregard for their legs and his convenience.
He was one of those wise men who regard beauty in the other sex as a very worthless and superficial qualification; or, to speak more truly, who rather chuse to possess every convenience of life with an ugly woman, than a handsome one without any of those conveniences.
to that whale, fishlike, If it thus for its guest's convenience Made things nice
I should wish to leave at your earliest convenience, Sir Percival.
Mr Richard Swiveller's apartments were in the neighbourhood of Drury Lane, and in addition to this convenience of situation had the advantage of being over a tobacconist's shop, so that he was enabled to procure a refreshing sneeze at any time by merely stepping out upon the staircase, and was saved the trouble and expense of maintaining a snuff-box.
I mean LITTLE conveniences; it is the little conveniences that make the real comfort of life.
reason teaching us that want would make us first invent that which was necessary, and, when that was obtained, then those things which were requisite for the conveniences and ornament of life), so should we conclude the same with respect to a political state; now everything in Egypt bears the marks of the most remote antiquity, for these people seem to be the most ancient of all others, and to have acquired laws and political order; we should therefore make a proper use of what is told us of them, and endeavour to find out what they have omitted.
I told him that my husband was now come on board; that though we were both under the present misfortune, yet we had been persons of a different character from the wretched crew that we came with, and desired to know of him, whether the captain might not be moved to admit us to some conveniences in the ship, for which we would make him what satisfaction he pleased, and that we would gratify him for his pains in procuring this for us.