control

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control freak

Someone who has an obsessive or compulsive need to control every aspect of a situation and/or the ways in which others act. My father can be such a control freak sometimes, always dictating how I should be living my life. Janice is a real control freak—she wouldn't even let me help her vacuum the carpet!
See also: control, freak

damage control

The efforts made to reduce, negate, or counteract damage, loss, or any other unfavorable outcome. The IT department was on serious damage control after it became apparent that our servers had been hacked. The senator has been doing damage control ever since he let slip racist remarks during a television interview.
See also: control, damage

controlled substance

A drug whose availability is limited by law. A: "I thought you could just find your medication on the shelf at the pharmacy." B: "Nah, I'm on a new one, and it's a controlled substance, so I have a prescription for it." I'm really glad I didn't follow in my brother's footsteps and become addicted to controlled substances.
See also: control, substance

in control

1. In charge; possessing the final authority in a hierarchy or situation. Who's in control here? I want to talk to the ranking officer.
2. Confident and capable, often when faced with a stressful situation. Your mother was terrified when she first learned to drive, but now she is completely in control behind the wheel.
See also: control

bring (someone or something) under (one's) control

1. To assume a position of power over a person, group, or thing. The terms of the treaty bring our country under the king's control. I think you'll have a hard time bringing the department under your control—they're very loyal to their old boss.
2. To assert control over someone or something, especially to limit their or its actions or potentially negative effects. In this usage, a pronoun does not need to be used between "under" and "control." Thankfully, the teacher was able to bring all the screaming kids under control.
See also: bring, control

control over (someone or something)

Power or influence over someone or something. Unfortunately, you're asking the wrong person for help because I have no control over the budget. Do you have any control over this group of screaming children?
See also: control, over

control the purse strings

To dictate the spending of a given group, such as a family, company, country, etc. After my dad's gambling problem came to light, my mother started to control the purse strings. The finance department controls the purse strings around here.
See also: control, purse, string

out of control

1. Without response to manual direction or input. The machine started spinning out of control.
2. Reckless or wild; in an unruly or unmanageable state or manner. I'm sorry for the way I acted last night. I had too much to drink and got a little out of control. The real estate market in this city is totally out of control.
See also: control, of, out

be in control

1. To be charge; to possess the final authority in a hierarchy or situation. Who's in control here? I want to talk to the ranking officer.
2. To be confident and capable, often when faced with a stressful situation. Your mother was terrified when she first learned to drive, but now she is completely in control behind the wheel.
See also: control

be under control

Said of a situation that is being successfully managed or addressed. The babysitter said that the kids are already in bed, and everything is under control. That leak is not under control—you need to call a plumber.
See also: control

be out of control

1. To be acting without responding to manual direction or input. The machine is out of control, and I don't know how to turn it off!
2. To be reckless or wild; to be in an unruly or unmanageable state or manner. I'm sorry for the way I acted last night; I had too much to drink and was a little out of control. The real estate market in this city is totally out of control.
See also: control, of, out

get out of control

To become reckless or wild; to start to be in an unruly or unmanageable state or manner. I'm sorry for the way I acted last night. I had too much to drink and got a little out of control. The real estate market in this city is getting totally out of control.
See also: control, get, of, out

get (someone or something) under (one's) control

1. To assume a position of power over a person, group, or thing. I think you'll have a hard time getting the department under your control—they're very loyal to their old boss.
2. To have power over someone or something so as to limit their or its potential negative effects. In this usage, a pronoun is not used between "under" and "control." Thankfully, the teacher was able to get all the screaming kids under control.
See also: control, get

keep (someone or something) under (one's) control

1. To assume a position of power over a person, group, or thing. The terms of the treaty keep our country under the king's control. I think you'll have a hard time keeping the department under your control—they're very loyal to their old boss.
2. To have power over someone or something so as to limit their or its potential negative effects. In this usage, a pronoun is not used between "under" and "control." Thankfully, the teacher was able to keep all the kids under control during the evacuation.
See also: control, keep

spin control

The shrewd management of the way in which a piece of news or information is presented or interpreted so that it best serves one's own interests. The company is a master of spin control, turning the most minor of successes into glorious accomplishments, while deflecting any failures as not being noteworthy. The president's spin control was in full force again today after fresh allegations of financial misconduct have arisen yet again.
See also: control, spin

bring someone or something under one's control

to achieve dominion over someone or something. The dictator was at last able to bring the army under his control. Harry could not bring Ron under his control. Walter could not be brought under Lily's control.
See also: bring, control

*control over someone or something

the power to direct or manage someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~.) I have no control over Mary. I can't stop her from running away. Who gave you control over what goes on in this house?
See also: control, over

control the purse strings

 and hold the purse strings
Fig. to be in charge of the money in a business or a household. I control the purse strings at our house. Mr. Williams is the treasurer. He controls the purse strings.
See also: control, purse, string

exercise power over

someone or something and exercise control over someone or something; exercise influence over someone or something to have someone or something under one's control or influence. The dictator exercised power over the island for many years. See if you can exercise some control over your appetite. I wish I could exercise some influence over the committee.
See also: exercise, over, power

in control of someone or something

 
1. in charge of someone or something. Who is in control of this place? I am not in control of her. She works for another department.
2. to have someone or something mastered or subdued; to have achieved management of someone or something. You should be in control of your dog at all times. The attendant was instructed to be in control of his patient at all times.
See also: control, of

*out of control

 
1. Lit. [of something, such as a machine] not responding to direction or instructions. (*Typically: be ~; go ~.) The computer is out of control and making funny-looking characters all over the screen. My CD player is out of control and only makes screeching noises.
2. and *out of hand Fig. acting wildly or violently. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Watch out, that dog is out of control. The kids got out of hand again.
See also: control, of, out

rage out of control

to become uncontrollable. The fire raged out of control and threatened the residential area. If we didn't do something quickly, the fire would be raging out of control.
See also: control, of, out, rage

take control of someone or something

to get the power and right to direct someone or something. I will take control of him and see that he does what I want. Will you take control of the Wilson project?
See also: control, of, take

*under control

Fig. manageable; restrained and controlled; not out of control. (*Typically: be ~; bring someone or something ~; get someone or something ~; have someone or something ~; keep someone or something ~.) We finally got things under control and functioning smoothly. The doctor felt she had the disease under control and that I would get well soon.
See also: control

damage control

Measures to minimize or curtail loss or harm. For example, As soon as they discovered the leak to the press, the senator's office worked night and day on damage control . Used literally since the 1950s, specifically for limiting the effect of an accident on a ship, this term began to be used figuratively in the 1970s.
See also: control, damage

out of control

Also, out of hand. No longer under management, direction, or regulation; unmanageable or unruly. For example, Housing costs are out of control, or The children were getting out of hand again. The first term uses control in the sense of "restraint," a usage dating from the late 1500s; the variant uses hand in the sense of "power" or "authority," and dates from the late 1800s.
See also: control, of, out

spin control

Manipulation of news, especially political news, as in The White House press secretary is a master of spin control. This idiom uses spin in the sense of "interpretation," that is, how something will be interpreted by the public (also see put a spin on). [c. 1980] Also see spin doctor.
See also: control, spin

be in conˈtrol (of something)

be able to organize your life well and keep calm: In spite of all her family problems, she’s really in control.
See also: control

be, get, etc. out of conˈtrol

be or become impossible to manage or to control: The children are completely out of control since their father left.A truck ran out of control on the hill.
See also: control, of, out

be under conˈtrol

be being dealt with successfully: Don’t worry — everything’s under control! OPPOSITE: get out of hand
See also: control

bring/get/keep something under conˈtrol

succeed in dealing with something so that it does not cause any harm: It took two hours to bring the fire under control.Please keep your dog under control!

control/hold the ˈpurse strings

(informal) be the person who controls the amount of money spent and the way in which it is spent: I’m the one who controls the purse strings in this office, and you must come to me if you want any more money.
See also: control, hold, purse, string
References in periodicals archive ?
InCycle sheets are lightweight and can be controllably engineered to meet the various performance requirements for different types of print, packaging and container applications.
For example, the material could be controllably morphed to reflect light in its 2D spaces and absorb light in its 3D shapes.
Based on the unique technological, experimental and conceptual knowledge developed by the host team, and on the background of the applicant, our successive objectives is to realize scalable quantum entanglement: to entangle two-photon states with our ultrabright QD-cavity systems at high rates, to use them to perform high fidelity teleportation with long coherence times between 2 different sources, and finally to controllably swap the entanglement between 2 entangled photon-pairs.
Compared with macromolecules, it is easier to controllably graft small molecules, such as 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, 2-hydroxyethyl triphenyl phosphonium, 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-phenyl-2-propanol, and n-alkyl groups, on MWCNTs (23-26).
Since less approximation is done compared with the traditional asymptotic expansion, the numerical SDP method opens up a hopeful way in computing PO integrals frequency independently and error controllably.
A spark from these electrodes glides along the quartz surface, controllably producing the desired wavelengths of UV light from ionized carbon.
0879--A New Blown Film Die For Controllably Forming And Extruding Micro-Layers, Polymer Blends And Composites
Namely, by applying voltage pulses to the molecule, it can be controllably switched between distinct "on" and "off" states, corresponding to the "0" and "1" states on which data storage is based.
These stable aircraft fly hands off, predictably, and controllably in turbulence.
The core desntiy and skin thickness can be varied controllably, says Hettinga.
Attempts are also being made to develop controllably reversible curing systems, in order to aid rubber recycling.
By chemically modifying the nanotube surface to controllably introduce light-emitting defects, we have developed carbon nanotubes as a single photon source, working toward implementing defect-state quantum emitters operating at room temperature and demonstrating their function in technologically useful wavelengths," said Stephen Doorn, leader of the project at Los Alamos and a member of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT).
The CU team demonstrated room-temperature deposition of silicon and gallium nitridelinchpin elements in many advanced microelectronicsas well as the ability to controllably etch specific materials, leading to precise spatial control in three dimensions.
Explaining the paradoxical simultaneity of quantum states, Cleland said, "These superposition states are a fundamental concept in quantum mechanics, but this is the first time they have been controllably created with light.
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