contrast

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contrast (someone or something) to (someone or something else)

To highlight or emphasize upon comparison the differences between two different people or things. Now contrast Joe's unenthusiastic reaction to Sally's unbridled glee over the news. It's only when you contrast our new project manager to the last one that you realize how inefficient the latter had been.
See also: contrast, something

contrast (someone or something) with (someone or something)

1. To highlight the differences between two people or things. A noun or pronoun can be used between "contrast" and "with." Now contrast Joe's unenthusiastic reaction with Sally's unbridled glee over the news.
2. To be obviously or clearly different from someone or something else. I think the paint color of the trim contrasts with the walls nicely.
See also: contrast

contrast to (something)

1. To differ very clearly upon comparison with another person or thing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "contrast" and "to." The attitudes and outlooks on the West Coast contrast sharply to those on the East Coast. He contrasts greatly to his older brother, who has always been something of an overachiever.
2. To highlight or emphasize upon comparison the differences between two different people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "contrast" and "to." Now contrast Joe's unenthusiastic reaction to Sally's unbridled glee over the news. It's only when you contrast our new project manager to the last one that you realize how inefficient the latter had been.
See also: contrast
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

contrast (someone or something) with (someone or something else)

 and contrast (someone or something) to (someone or something else)
to examine people or things in a way that will show their differences. Contrast Sally with Sam, for instance, to see real differences. Contrast the busy geometry of a Gothic cathedral to the simple lines of an old Saxon castle.
See also: contrast

contrast with someone or something

 
1. to be different from someone or something. Bill's cheery attitude really contrasts with the gloom of his twin brother, Bob. This stiped tie really contrasts with that polka-dot shirt.
2. [for a color or pattern, etc.] to show a marked difference with or complement another. The black one contrasts nicely with the white one.
See also: contrast
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Contrast media are a group of pharmaceuticals that aid in the enhanced delineation of tissues to better direct the diagnosis of disease.
of Colorado (UC), Boulder; and The Children's Hospital (TCH), Denver, Colo., have shown that nanoscale magnets in the form of iron-containing molecules can be used to improve the contrast between healthy and diseased tissues in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.
In contrast, in predicting choices of consumer products and political candidates, self-reports prove superior to IAT scores, according to Poehlman's review.
All of these contrasts should provide clues as to why the fates of Coney and Blackpool were so different (as well as show the futility of generalized explanations of the decline of Victorian industrial saturnalia).
This picture is contrasted with the weakness or sheer absence of Arab lobbies.
Dare one characterize Sonnier as a witty formalist, distilling, fine-tuning, and (with no loss of drama) softening the disconcerting contrasts that define abstract art?
And again, in "Donelle", Airmet contrasts his partner's wit with tenderness:
Two contrasts in the book are striking, the first is effective the second extremely disappointing.
A flat and dispersed light of "relative uniformity" (101) was probably what was aimed for, the elimination of extreme contrasts having a range of advantages, from the fact that such light would have made it easy for the eye to adjust to the general waning of natural light as an afternoon wore on, to the fact that the neutrality of dispersed light would have been amenable to a situation in which spectators were required to imagine a range of situations from full daylight to total darkness, even as they needed to see what was taking place, regardless of the fictive conditions of the scene.
At every level the design is enriched by deliberately contrived contrasts. The rooms contrast the introversion of the sleeping areas with the extroversion of the bay windows.
On the other hand, Gracie Mae's description of this first encounter contrasts Traynor with the deacon.
It is important to realize, as well, that the elderly in nursing homes typically need 3.5 times the brightness of lighting that younger people do to be able to see contrasts.