contract

(redirected from contractibility)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

a verbal contract isn't worth the paper it's written on

A humorous phrase emphasizing the lack of value and reliability in an oral contract. Typically attributed to 20th-century movie mogul Samuel Goldwyn, though the phrase is likely a misquote. Get everything in writing, Jean. How many times do I have to tell you—a verbal contract isn't worth the paper it's written on.

contract for (something)

To enter into an agreement with someone or a group to do or produce something. We contracted for that massive scanning project with an outside company because no one on our staff has time to do it.
See also: contract

contract for (something) with (someone or something)

To enter into an agreement with someone or a group to do or produce something. We contracted for that massive scanning project with an outside company because no one on our staff has time to do it.
See also: contract

contract out

To give a job or assignment to an outside entity (so as to avoid doing the job oneself). A noun or pronoun can be used between "contract" and "out." We contracted the project out because no one on our staff has the time to scan all of those documents.
See also: contract, out

contract with (someone or something)

To agree with someone or a group to do something. No one on our staff has the time to scan all of those documents, so we'll contract with a company that can do it for us.
See also: contract

contract with (someone or something) for (something)

To enter into an agreement with someone or a group to do or produce something. We contracted with an outside company for that massive scanning project that no one on our staff has time to do.
See also: contract

put a contract out on (one)

slang To order for one to be assassinated. Usually said in reference to organized crime. The mob put a contract out on the accountant because he had agreed to testify in court. It turns out that he had put a contract out on the owner of the business so that he could gain control of it.
See also: contract, on, out, put

sweetheart contract

1. An industrial agreement made between an employer and local labor union officials containing terms beneficial to the employer without the knowledge of the employees, typically in exchange for money to the union or its leaders. It was later discovered that the union leader had made a sweetheart contract with the company that eliminated employees' right to strike in exchange for a hefty yearly bonus for himself. The automotive manufacturer decided to move its factories to a different country, where it established a sweetheart contract with the local labor union to pay workers substantially less than those previously enjoyed by American employees.
2. Any kind of agreement or contract that is mutually beneficial two the two parties directly involved, typically at the expense of a third party that is not privy to the agreement. It turns out the athletic director had in place a sweetheart contract with the national athletics association, essentially receiving kickbacks every time one of his athletes performed well. The charity has come under fire for what some are calling a sweetheart contract with a for-profit events organizer that receives nearly 40% of the annual donations the charity receives.
See also: contract, sweetheart
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

contract something out

to make an agreement with someone to do a specific amount of work. (Rather than doing it oneself or in one's own place of business.) I will contract this out and have it done by consultants. I contracted out this kind of job the last time.
See also: contract, out

contract with someone (for something)

 and contract (with someone) for something
to make an agreement with someone to produce or supply something, or to do something. I will have to contract with an expert for that part of the project. We contracted with a local builder for a new kitchen. Did you contract for plumbing work with Eric?
See also: contract

put a contract out on someone

[for an underworld character] to order someone to kill someone else. The mob put out a contract on some crook from Detroit.
See also: contract, on, out, put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

contract out

v.
To engage another person or company by contract to undertake some job that is typically considered part of one's business: Many companies contract out administrative tasks in order to concentrate on sales and marketing.
See also: contract, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
We now combine the above convergence theorem with virtual stability to obtain the contractibility of fixed point sets of certain continuous quasi-nonexpansive mean-type mappings.
We show that asset contractibility affects the insurance contract terms and the degree of achievable risk-sharing compared with self-insurance, except in the limit when insurance markets are perfectly competitive (free entry).
(27-29) In contrast, other studies have reported improvement in myocardial contractibility within the first intraoperative days or within the first postoperative weeks.
Some triggering factors, such as intercurrent illness, hypoglycaemia, and surgical procedures, increase the production of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla with a subsequent impact mainly on the cardiovascular system and onset of manifestations such as increasing heart frequency, elevation of blood pressure, increased myocardial contractibility, and development of cardiac conduction anomalies [72].
In pathologies with diastolic dysfunction, when an abrupt increase in blood pressure occurs, the pressure-volume loop shifts to the upper right without decrease in [E.sub.max] (absolute index of contractibility).
Disruption of any of these cellular transport mechanisms, especially 3[Na.sup.+]/2[K.sup.+] ATPase pump, may cause abnormalities in muscle contractibility and paralysis.
The first isomorphism comes from the HES (homotopy exact sequence) applied to the pair ([S.sup.+]G, G) and the contractibility of [S.sup.+]G; a similar argument gives the second isomorphism.
The heart is able to provide for each organ of the human body continually, throughout lifetime, the food and energy necessary for a normal functioning due to the heart muscle properties (excitability, automatism, conductivity and contractibility).
Incorporating a penalty default here thus leads contractibility to trump fiduciary treatment.
The determination of the compressive strength of concrete made from concrete recyclate was chosen on purpose as, so far, most institutions have focused on modifying mainly the physical properties of concrete made from concrete recyclate, such as contractibility, frost resistance, water permeability coefficient, leachability, etc.
Cao, "Dimethylsulfoxide-soluble smoking particles and nicotine affect vascular contractibility," Archives of Pharmacal Research, vol.
See generally Mohsen Manesh, Delaware and the Market for LLC Law: A Theory of Contractibility and Legal Indeterminacy, 52 B.C.L.
By injecting at the predetermined sites, botulinum toxin brings about reduction in gummy smile by weakening the contractibility of upper lip elevator muscles and also marked effacement of nasolabial fold.13 Partial to complete upper lip drooping, due to hypotony or atony of the central elevators may lead to excessive upper lateral pulling of Zygomaticus major and as a consequence a "joker" smile may result.19 Since the dose injected was minimal, there was no perceivable hypokinesis at 6 months follow up.
intermediate form of contractibility falling between traditional
The precise mechanism by which the detrusor regains its contractibility is largely unknown, but may come from any one, or a combination, of the different neuronal, neuromuscular or muscular physiological pathways.