contempt

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Related to contempts: hold in contempt

beneath contempt

Abominable. The atrocities committed by this regime are beneath contempt.
See also: beneath, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I'm afraid it's true when they say that familiarity breeds contempt, because I've been stuck with Larry in the apartment all week, and I'm absolutely sick of him.
See also: breed, contempt

hold (someone or something) in contempt

1. In law, to find someone guilty of showing disrespect or disobedience to the judge or procedures of a court. You will stop this abusive line of questioning or I will hold you in contempt of court!
2. To regard someone or something with disdain or disrespect. He says he doesn't vote because he holds the whole political system in contempt. She has held her father in contempt ever since he refused to give his blessing to her marriage.
See also: contempt, hold

in contempt (of court)

In law, guilty of showing disrespect or disobedience to the judge or procedures of a court. You will stop this abusive line of questioning or I will hold you in contempt of court!
See also: contempt

beneath contempt

exceedingly contemptible. What you have done is beneath contempt. Your rude behavior is beneath contempt.
See also: beneath, contempt

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

in contempt (of court)

showing disrespect for a judge or courtroom procedures. The bailiff ejected the lawyer who was held in contempt. The judge found the juror in contempt of court when she screamed at the attorney.
See also: contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt

hold someone or something in contempt

consider someone or something to be unworthy of respect or attention.
In formal legal contexts, holding someone in contempt means that they are judged to have committed the offence of contempt of court, i.e. they are guilty of disrespect or disobedience to the authority of a court in the administration of justice.

beneath conˈtempt

very shameful or disgusting: Stealing the money was bad enough. Trying to get someone else blamed for it was beneath contempt.
See also: beneath, contempt

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt

beneath contempt

Not even worthy of despising. The word “beneath” means the same as “below” or “under” but generally has been confined to poetic and archaic locutions. The pairing with “contempt” has been a cliché since the late nineteenth century.
See also: beneath, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Overexposure to or knowing something or someone too thoroughly can turn liking into hostility. The idea behind this expression dates from ancient times—the Roman writer Publilius Syrus used it about 43 b.c.—and approximately twelve hundred years later Pope Innocent III repeated it, also in Latin. The first record of it in English appeared in Nicholas Udall’s translation of Erasmus’s sayings (1548): “Familiaritye bringeth contempt.” Later writers often stated it with humor or irony, notably Mark Twain in his unpublished diaries (Notebooks, ca. 1900): “Familiarity breeds contempt—and children.”
See also: breed, contempt
References in periodicals archive ?
First, there is a difference between a court's inherent authority to police conduct within its jurisdiction and the authority to issue contempt orders.
A court of the United States shall have power to punish by fine or imprisonment, or both, at its discretion, such contempt of its authority, and none other, as--
Second, within the specific domain of contempt, there has developed a division between direct and indirect contempt.
Notwithstanding any other provision of these rules, the court (other than a magistrate judge) may summarily punish a person who commits criminal contempt in its presence if the judge saw or heard the contemptuous conduct and so certifies; a magistrate judge may summarily punish a person as provided in 28 U.S.C.
For example, whether some relief falls within the inherent authority of a court implicates separation of powers, as perhaps does whether it is direct or indirect contempt; whether a contempt order is deemed "criminar" implicates the Due Process Clause and associated constitutional protections.
After considering the history and role of bankruptcy commissioners, we are ready to engage in an informed analysis of the statutory and constitutional considerations underlying the question whether today's bankruptcy judges have the authority to exercise criminal contempt power.
Can today's bankruptcy courts issue criminal contempt orders?
(97) The Court's recognition of a congressional prerogative to circumscribe or delineate the contempt power continued in its discussion of the seventeenth section of the Judiciary Act of 1789.
(53.) See Dobbs, supra note 50, at 224 (noting that both the classification of direct or indirect contempts is in many cases easily made).
2009) (noting contempts can be "regarded as criminal in character even though they arise from, or are ancillary to, a civil action"); Henry v.
Local Union 5760, 173 N.E.2d 331, 338 (Ohio 1961) ("[Violations which are on their surface offenses against the party for whose benefit the order was made are civil contempts. ").
While most direct contempts are almost certainly willful actions, they may not all be meant to disrupt or offend the court.
at 827 n.2 (noting that summary adjudication is available for direct contempts).
821, 827 n.2 (1994) (observing that the civil and criminal distinction "does not pertain" to direct contempts unless a serious penalty is contemplated).
(187.) Summary adjudication is only available for direct contempts of court.