conspiracy

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conspiracy of silence

An agreement, either explicit or unspoken, among members of a group to keep secret certain information that, if exposed, could be damaging to the group, its interests, or its associates. Knowing that public knowledge of their imminent takeover by the rival company could jeopardize their continued employment thereafter, the board of directors agreed to a strict conspiracy of silence until the deal was finalized. The doctors in the hospital were engaged in a tacit conspiracy of silence, as each knew that bringing to light their colleague's misbehavior could end up damaging their own reputations in the process.
See also: conspiracy, of, silence

conspiracy of silence

A tacit or explicit agreement to keep something secret. For example, In this state's medical society there is a conspiracy of silence regarding incompetent practitioners . This term was first used as a complaint about lack of attention, but today it more often refers to remaining silent about something unfavorable or criminal. [Late 1800s]
See also: conspiracy, of, silence

a conspiracy of silence

If there is a conspiracy of silence, people who know about something have agreed that they will not tell anyone about it. Detectives have run into a conspiracy of silence in the close communities here.
See also: conspiracy, of, silence

a conspiracy of silence

an agreement to say nothing about an issue that should be generally known.
This expression appears to have originated with the French philosopher Auguste Comte ( 1798–1857 ).
See also: conspiracy, of, silence

a conˌspiracy of ˈsilence

an agreement not to talk publicly about something which should not remain secret: As no one was ever convicted of the murders, it is widely believed that there may have been a conspiracy of silence maintained by the victims’ friends and families.
See also: conspiracy, of, silence

conspiracy of silence

An agreement, either tacit or explicit, to disclose nothing about an individual or situation. The term nearly always refers to disclosing something unfavorable, or even criminal. For example, physicians often have been accused of protecting an incompetent member of their profession by keeping quiet. Dating from the late nineteenth century, the term at first was used by individuals complaining of lack of attention. The poet Lewis Morris reportedly complained to Oscar Wilde that a conspiracy of silence prevented his works from being reviewed and asked what he should do, whereupon Wilde replied, “Join it.”
See also: conspiracy, of, silence
References in periodicals archive ?
The federal minister said that the non-believers wanted to sabotage the peace of the Muslim Ummah by hatching anti-Islam conspiracies.
Fazal suggested that political parties would have to change its thinking for foiling conspiracies and work united for progress and integrity of the country.
Slater, 2007; Stroud, 2007), it is not surprising that individuals who distrust the government are inclined to believe government conspiracies (Crocker et al.
Lastly, the slave revolts, leading up to and including that of Spartacus, are narrated as a series of conspiracies by ancient historians.
12) We explain the key fallacies in this argument, demonstrating why conspiracies unaccompanied by non-expressive overt acts are as much pure communication as are many categories of fully protected expression.
Walshaw argues that a primary reason for the revolutionaries to see conspiracies everywhere was their failure to imagine that the peasantry, a group previously excluded from politics, could become politically conscious.
The major countries which often accuse others of concocting conspiracies also suffer from conspiracies.
In addition to conspiracies between corporations and their agents, courts have also considered whether a conspiracy can exist between a parent corporation and its subsidiaries in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
There are the references to repressed sexuality, previous hoaxes and conspiracies, there are the holes in Albert's biography, the questions about his relationship to Harris, the latent paranoia, the psychology of lies and the psychoanalysis of delusion.
In the early eighteenth century, slaves organized two major conspiracies in New York City.
Conspiracies today are often massive, hulking entities encompassing a broad spectrum of actors, acts, and localities.
With this essay, Hofstadter commented on two aspects of conspiracy theory that are with us today--the tremendous scope of such conspiracy theories and the self-righteous attitudes of those who believe and oppose such conspiracies.
In order to best address the problem of drug trafficking, police and prosecutors must recognize and properly charge drug conspiracies.
Conspiracies brought Napoleon, Lenin, Peron and Saddam Hussein to power; they are behind most coups d'etat and revolutions.