consequence

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pay the consequences

To face, accept, or suffer repercussions for one's actions or words, especially that which would be expected to incur punishment. (A less common version of "suffer the consequences.") After three nights of heavy drinking, I'm really going to be paying the consequences come Monday morning! With the judge handing down the maximum possible sentence, this monster will be paying the consequences for his crimes for the rest of his life.
See also: consequence, pay

suffer the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to suffer the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will suffer the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, suffer

face the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to face the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will face the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, face

damn the consequences

A phrase used when one intends to do something despite it likely having a negative effect or outcome. They decided to party the night before the exam and damn the consequences.
See also: consequence, damn

damn the expense

A phrase used when one intends to do something with little concern for how much it will cost. It's our baby's first birthday party, so we're getting a pony and damn the expense!
See also: damn, expense

of little consequence

Not very important; having very little significance or value. The company makes so much money that the flop of this product on the market is actually of very little consequence to them. I'm of so little consequence in our organization that I doubt anyone would notice if I just stopped coming in one day.
See also: consequence, little, of

of no consequence

Completely unimportant; having no significance or value. This issue is really of no consequence to the board, so let's please skip it for the sake of everyone's time. Being a part of a large corporation can often leave you feeling like you're of no consequence.
See also: consequence, no, of

of consequence

Important; significant; having value. We only have a limited amount of time in which to conduct this meeting, so let's please stick to matters of consequence. He was the only person of consequence at the party, so once he left, I felt there was no longer a reason to stay.
See also: consequence, of

in consequence (of something)

as a result of something; because of something. In consequence of the storm, there was no electricity. The wind blew down the wires. In consequence, we had no electricity.
See also: consequence

in consequence

As a result, therefore, as in She was away for years and in consequence has few friends here. The prepositional phrase in consequence of means "as a result of," as in In consequence of this finding, there is sure to be further investigation. [Late 1600s]
See also: consequence

of consequence

Important, as in For all matters of consequence we have to consult the board, or Only scientists of consequence have been invited to speak. This idiom was first recorded in 1489.
See also: consequence, of

in ˈconsequence (of something)

(formal) as a result of something: The child was born deformed in consequence of an injury to its mother.
See also: consequence

ˈdamn the consequences, expense, etc.

(spoken) used to say that you are going to do something even though you know it may be expensive, have bad results, etc: Let’s celebrate and damn the expense!
See also: damn

in consequence

As a result; consequently.
See also: consequence
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Specifically, legislatures have increasingly attached severe collateral consequences to misdemeanor offenses--consequences that formerly were triggered only by felonies.
Collateral consequences have long been hidden, buried in the language of state and federal statutes and codes, without a straightforward way for individuals, their attorneys or their sentencing judges to know which ones might be pertinent and applicable to a specific situation.
Schneider has cleverly put to work the science of consequences in this book.
In this case, the cultural consequences selective of the IBCs (and their aggregate products) are distinct from the aggregate product itself.
Once again, the participants' admissions were shaped by the proximal consequences.
While these collateral consequences are intended to protect public safety, it is also in the public interest to allow those who have served their sentences to reintegrate into society so they can pay their fines and support themselves and their families.
This Article first provides a brief history of collateral consequences and reentry.
The researchers note that their results may not be widely generalizable and that the limited number of potential consequences they studied "may not describe adolescents' full experiences.
Applying consequences is critical to shaping behavior.
But with pay-as-you-go, every such proposal would have to be linked directly to a consequence, and those consequences will not be popular.
We asked the panelists to review the material and to consider the most important consequences or harms to which seventh and eighth graders would be exposed if they used these drugs.
This potential effect is coupled with the fact that young people--who don't have the life experience of their adult counterparts, nor the insight that accompanies it--are more likely to downplay the consequences of their actions and are perhaps less likely to plan ahead.
A person's intentions are never fully represented in all of their choices because one can never predict all of the potential consequences (Malle, B, 2001).
That said, From Welfare to Workfare deserves a wide readership, especially for its success in showing how a "silo" mentality and bureaucratic structure have consequences all too predictable when academics, foundations, unions, businesses, policymakers, and lawmakers try to do good.
Every decision you make will have its consequences.