consequence


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damn the consequences

A phrase used when one intends to do something despite it likely having a negative effect or outcome. They decided to party the night before the exam and damn the consequences.
See also: consequence, damn

damn the expense

A phrase used when one intends to do something with little concern for how much it will cost. It's our baby's first birthday party, so we're getting a pony and damn the expense!
See also: damn, expense

face the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to face the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will face the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, face

in consequence

As a result (of something); therefore; thus. I heard you borrowed my car without permission. In consequence, you're grounded for two weeks. She didn't study for the exam and, in consequence, she failed. What did she think was going to happen?
See also: consequence

in consequence of (something)

As a result (of something). I heard you borrowed my car without permission. In consequence of your actions, you're grounded for two weeks. She didn't study for the exam and, in consequence of that, she failed. What did she think was going to happen?
See also: consequence, of

of consequence

Important; significant; having value. We only have a limited amount of time in which to conduct this meeting, so let's please stick to matters of consequence. He was the only person of consequence at the party, so once he left, I felt there was no longer a reason to stay.
See also: consequence, of

of little consequence

Not very important; having very little significance or value. The company makes so much money that the flop of this product on the market is actually of very little consequence to them. I'm of so little consequence in our organization that I doubt anyone would notice if I just stopped coming in one day.
See also: consequence, little, of

of no consequence

Completely unimportant; having no significance or value. This issue is really of no consequence to the board, so let's please skip it for the sake of everyone's time. Being a part of a large corporation can often leave you feeling like you're of no consequence.
See also: consequence, no, of

pay the consequences

To face, accept, or suffer repercussions for one's actions or words, especially that which would be expected to incur punishment. (A less common version of "suffer the consequences.") After three nights of heavy drinking, I'm really going to be paying the consequences come Monday morning! With the judge handing down the maximum possible sentence, this monster will be paying the consequences for his crimes for the rest of his life.
See also: consequence, pay

suffer the consequences

To experience negative repercussions for one's actions or words, especially those that one would expect to incur punishment. I told you not to try to sneak in, and now that you've been caught, you're just going to have to suffer the consequences. If we do nothing to curb this pollution, I guarantee we will suffer the consequences in the future.
See also: consequence, suffer

in consequence (of something)

as a result of something; because of something. In consequence of the storm, there was no electricity. The wind blew down the wires. In consequence, we had no electricity.
See also: consequence

in consequence

As a result, therefore, as in She was away for years and in consequence has few friends here. The prepositional phrase in consequence of means "as a result of," as in In consequence of this finding, there is sure to be further investigation. [Late 1600s]
See also: consequence

of consequence

Important, as in For all matters of consequence we have to consult the board, or Only scientists of consequence have been invited to speak. This idiom was first recorded in 1489.
See also: consequence, of

in ˈconsequence (of something)

(formal) as a result of something: The child was born deformed in consequence of an injury to its mother.
See also: consequence

ˈdamn the consequences, expense, etc.

(spoken) used to say that you are going to do something even though you know it may be expensive, have bad results, etc: Let’s celebrate and damn the expense!
See also: damn

in consequence

As a result; consequently.
See also: consequence
References in periodicals archive ?
judges generally reduce a sentence to avoid a collateral consequence
avoid the consequence. For example, in Abdurazak c R, the Quebec Court
Cultural consequence on a VR 2 schedule (the cultural consequence was presented on average every 2 trials).
In the first condition (Baseline) there was no cultural consequence and no communication for all groups.
So the proximal consequence was meeting with the police officer immediately after the interview, while the distal consequence was to return to the lab in several weeks to answer the repetitive questions.
For the first study, the researchers interviewed subjects about their prior criminal and unethical behaviors, with their admissions and denials each paired with proximal or distal consequences.
Collateral consequences frequently are deportation but can also mean loss of driving privileges, unemployment, loss of a professional or trade license, eviction and homelessness, which all made a defendant's eventual rehabilitation problematic at best.
Last month, Ramsey County Attorney John Choi issued a prosecution policy regarding consideration of collateral consequences. He told his staff that that prosecutors must "consider collateral consequences to inform your discretion as you administer justice" and "[w]henever possible, without adversely impacting public safety, your goal should be to reach dispositions that don't lead to deportation or other disproportionate consequences."
In this case, the potential for curtailed funding is a consequence of the program's poor test results, which should be the focus of attention but is not directly or centrally addressed in the risk statement.
* Announces an unavoidable programmatic event and consequence as a risk:
(79) More commonly, the prosecutor thinks the consequence is not only justified but also important.
Collateral consequences have long been hidden, buried in the language of state and federal statutes and codes, without a straightforward way for individuals, their attorneys or their sentencing judges to know which ones might be pertinent and applicable to a specific situation.
Students who had read about positive social consequences as a result of not drinking were more likely to record lower alcohol intentions.
Schneider applies her insights in practical ways, considering how our actions may shape the behavior of others or how understanding signals and consequences can help us stick to a diet or overcome an addiction.
'There are consequences like a cross default provision, which means that a default in contract A will trigger a default in contract B, C, D, E, and so on.