raise (one's) consciousness

(redirected from consciousness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to consciousness: levels of consciousness

raise (one's) consciousness

To increase one's awareness or understanding of one's own needs or the needs of others. Traveling abroad really raised my consciousness about the plight of the poor around the world.
See also: raise
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
And is it any wonder that Korzybski was introducing his non-Aristotelian system at just about the time that radio and film had come to dominate our collective consciousness? Aristotle was very much a product of the old, literate consciousness, which is also characterized by highly abstract thinking.
Critique: Impressively well written, organized and informative, "The Metrics of Human Consciousness" is enhanced with the inclusion of three appendices: Overview of the Origins of the Seven Levels Mode; World views and stages of psychological development; The Seven Stages of Psychological Development.
This book examines the idea of consciousness as a phenomenal reality in the writings of Howard W.
Often known as "the hard problem," consciousness has been an issue of debate in recent years in the fields of religion and science as well as philosophy.
CULTIVATING CONSCIOUSNESS; AN EAST-WEST JOURNEY by K.
Identity and Difference: John Locke and the Invention of Consciousness
TEHRAN (FNA)- A review and update of a controversial 20-year-old theory of consciousness published in Physics of Life Reviews claims that consciousness derives from deeper level, finer scale activities inside brain neurons.
After a search of the scientific literature Fred Travis, PhD, Director of the Center for Brain, Consciousness, and Cognition at Maharishi University of Management, reported that physiological measures and first-person descriptions of transcendental experiences and higher states have only been investigated during practice of the Transcendental Meditation (tm) technique.
Although Thiel gives the arguments of many philosophers their due, Locke's revolutionary account of personal identity, according to which consciousness is what constitutes our inseparable selves, is central to Thiel's narrative.
This book gives substance to this claim in two respects: it traces the emergence and development of the early modern debate on both consciousness and personal identity.
Seeing the providence and protection of God in each event helps us to develop God- consciousness.
Alan Palmer and Lisa Zunshine have published two important monographs (respectively Fictional Minds and Why We Read Fiction), which Herman himself lists under the heading of "Issues of Consciousness Representation" in the entry "Cognitive Narratology" for the de Gruyter Handbook of Narratology.
In the absence of differentiation between phenomena and facts (Bleeker 1974a, 227, 234; comp.: Bianchi 1974, 221), researchers have considered epoche and reduction similarly, as a form of unprejudiced concentration (Bleeker 1974b, 198-199; comp.: Widengren 1974, 258, 270-271) (more precisely, restraining from truth statements, causal connections or additional unapt (non-religious) contexts), not as stages of preparation for pure consciousness. Reduction was not usually mentioned separately or was, simply, used to indicate the reduction of religion to the non-religious.
Being stuck in the Hegelian circle of the fighting consciousneses we are unfortunately not any closer to solving of this problem than, perhaps, Hegel himself who has drawn the phenomenon of self-consciousness as the highest negative instance that comes to itself only through the full negation of the preliminary stages of consciousness. Like the master and the slave, these conflicting structures, passing through the medium of death, must annihilate each other in order to inaugurate the pure power of self-consciousness.