conscientious objector


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

conscientious objector

A person who refuses to serve in the military due to religious or ethical beliefs running contrary to violence or war. My great-grandfather was imprisoned for refusing to fight in the first World War as a conscientious objector.
References in periodicals archive ?
United States when it held the appellant, who specifically characterized his belief as non-religious, qualified for conscientious objector status within the same statutory exemption of "religious training and belief." (45) Justice Harlan characterized the opinion as a "remarkable feat of judicial surgery to remove ...
In 2007, Korea was presented with specific measures to adopt an alternative military program for conscientious objectors with five relevant legislative bills.
Despite that, throughout the short history of the Israeli state, people have either refused to execute certain missions (selective conscientious objectors) or refused to be recruited.
"Many conscientious objectors, such as Quakers, were given non-combatant service roles doing things like working on ambulances.
"So why are these Conscientious Objectors with the jitterbug complex allowed to go out, drink and publicly flaunt their draft status in front of hundreds of people who have Dear Ones in the uniform of these United States," he thundered.
For example, while all actors on the taxonomy might suffer consequences for their actions (economic, social, or political), the absolutist conscientious objector to military service and the most radical homeschoolers have the potential to suffer extreme economic sanctions and/or imprisonment.
Conscientious objector Charles Jehnzen described the contempt as "pathetic." His wife couldn't find work after "somebody found out she was a wife of a Conchie," he said.
His application to be registered as a Conscientious Objector was backed by letters, including one from a councillor, who wrote: "Mr Hannan is a man of irreproachable character and high moral convictions.
He is refused official recognition as a conscientious objector and is told he either has to fight or go to prison.
For the most part the conscientious objector was viewed as "unintelligent unimaginative, and obdurate" (148).
A conscientious objector, Birky didn't believe in killing another human being, but he did believe in serving his country.
For example, the narrative of 'war enthusiasm', which the author describes and dissects as an idealised image of public opinion in 1914 and the success of voluntary recruiting, the limits of which are clearly shown in the need for conscription in 1916 (which in turn created the legal category of conscientious objector to military service, or to combatant service).
Army to deny Muslim soldier, Naser Abdo's request for conscientious objector status, accusing him of 'treason' and urging the military to punish him to the full extent of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.
The Court-Martial of Charlie Newell a novel by Massachusetts lawyer Gerard Shirar is a compelling read about a young black man's battle against army bureaucracy racial and religious prejudice and societal indifference during the tail end of the "war to end all wars." The story according to Shirar is a fictional account based on a 1918 court-martial of a conscientious objector at Fort Caswell in North Carolina.