conquer

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divide and conquer

1. To gain or maintain power by generating tension among others, especially those less powerful, so that they cannot unite in opposition. Rachel is so popular because she divides and conquers all of her minions and makes sure they all dislike each other.
2. To accomplish something by having several people work on it separately and simultaneously. The only way we'll ever get this project finished on time is if we divide and conquer. I'll put the slides together while you type up the hand-out.
See also: and, conquer, divide

I came, I saw, I conquered

Used to express one's total victory over someone or something. Often altered in various ways, as to suit the context, for humorous effect, etc. From the Latin phrase veni, vidi, vici, popularly attributed to Julius Caesar following his victory at the Battle of Zela. A: "Well, how did the interview go?" B: "I came, I saw, I conquered! You're looking at FlemCo's new Vice President of Marketing!" A: "Who won the football game?" B: "We did, by a landslide! We came, we saw, we kicked their butts!"
See also: conquer

stoop to conquer

To adopt a role, position, attitude, behavior, undertaking, etc., that is seen as being beneath one's abilities or social position in order to achieve one's end. The wealthy congressman has to start taking advantage of more popular, mainstream entertainment platforms because the only way he can come back at this point is if he stoops to conquer.
See also: conquer, stoop
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

divide and conquer

Also, divide and govern or rule . Win by getting one's opponents to fight among themselves. For example, Divide and conquer was once a very successful policy in sub-Saharan Africa. This expression is a translation of the Latin maxim, Divide et impera ("divide and rule"), and began to appear in English about 1600.
See also: and, conquer, divide
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

divide and conquer

BRITISH & AMERICAN or

divide and rule

BRITISH
COMMON If you try to divide and conquer or divide and rule, you try to keep control over a group of people by encouraging them to argue amongst themselves. Trade unions are concerned that management may be tempted into a policy of divide and rule. The Summit sends a very strong message to him that he's not going to divide and conquer. Note: This expression has its origin in the Latin phrase `divide et impera'. It describes one of the tactics which the Romans used to rule their empire.
See also: and, conquer, divide
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

divide and conquer/rule/govern, to

To win by getting one’s opponents to fight among themselves. This strategy not only was discovered to be effective in wartime by the most ancient of adversaries, but was also applied to less concrete affairs by Jesus: “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand” (Matthew 12:25). The exact term is a translation of a Roman maxim, divide et impera (divide and rule).
See also: and, conquer, divide, rule

love conquers all

True love triumphs over adversity. This ancient adage was first stated by the Roman poet Virgil in Ciris: “Omnia vincit amor: quid enim non vinceret ille?” (Love conquers all: for what could Love not conquer?). It has been repeated ever since, by Chaucer and Tennyson, among others, but it may be obsolescent.
See also: all, conquer, love
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Without ignoring the impact of the diversification of the local economy, rising working-class living standards and the spread of respectability, it is argued that the town's police force (and in particular the rank-and-file men who were most in contact with the local population) played a major role in the conquering of the British Ballarat.
The program's third piece, Hail to the Conquering Hero, was choreographed in 1985 by Stowell as a tribute to George Frideric Handel on the three-hundredth anniversary of the composer's birth.
Jay Olshansky and his colleagues reported that humans are reaching the upward limit of extending life by conquering disease.
Mrs Eryl Proctor calls for the record to be set straight over Conquering Leader
Conquering armies have very frequently gendered their defeated rivals as women, often sodomizing or castrating fallen warriors.
They're not conquering something, they're being conquered.
King of the Franks from 768 and emperor from 800, he launched a vast expansion of his rule, conquering Germany, Bavaria, and Saxony, bringing Christianity to the people.
Margielyn Didal secured the Philippines' fourth gold medal after conquering the women's street skateboarding event in the 2018 Asian Games at JSC SkateBoard Stadium in Palembang.
Sydney, Dec 11(ANI): Australian fast bowler Mitchell Johnson, a man intent on conquering the third Ashes Test against England in Perth, has to conquer himself first, according to noted cricket commentator Peter Roebuck.
"Conquering Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Newest Techniques for Overcoming Symptoms, Regaining Hope, and Getting Your Life Back" is a guide for the afflicted in dealing with the anxieties related to such things so that they can get their life back on track.
IT was recently stated (June 21) that Wales' "Royal House was completely annihilated by conquering forces".
Conquering the surrounding city-states, Hammurabi creates the first kingdom of Babylonia.
Curiously, they refrained from conquering Tlaxcala because it provided a training ground for young Aztec warriors and a source of sacrificial victims." In short, the entire scheme devised by Tlacaelel was intended to bring about a state of perpetual warfare, with the Aztecs either preparing for war or fighting wars against enemies they would never entirely destroy.
Today's French and English might as well file a similar complaint with Julius Caesar's descendants for conquering Gaul, or ask why Natives didn't sail east to discover and conquer Europe.