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divide and conquer

1. To gain or maintain power by generating tension among others, especially those less powerful, so that they cannot unite in opposition. Rachel is so popular because she divides and conquers all of her minions and makes sure they all dislike each other.
2. To accomplish something by having several people work on it separately and simultaneously. The only way we'll ever get this project finished on time is if we divide and conquer. I'll put the slides together while you type up the hand-out.
See also: and, conquer, divide

I came, I saw, I conquered

Used to express one's total victory over someone or something. Often altered in various ways, as to suit the context, for humorous effect, etc. From the Latin phrase veni, vidi, vici, popularly attributed to Julius Caesar following his victory at the Battle of Zela. A: "Well, how did the interview go?" B: "I came, I saw, I conquered! You're looking at FlemCo's new Vice President of Marketing!" A: "Who won the football game?" B: "We did, by a landslide! We came, we saw, we kicked their butts!"
See also: conquer

stoop to conquer

To adopt a role, position, attitude, behavior, undertaking, etc., that is seen as being beneath one's abilities or social position in order to achieve one's end. The wealthy congressman has to start taking advantage of more popular, mainstream entertainment platforms because the only way he can come back at this point is if he stoops to conquer.
See also: conquer, stoop
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

divide and conquer

Also, divide and govern or rule . Win by getting one's opponents to fight among themselves. For example, Divide and conquer was once a very successful policy in sub-Saharan Africa. This expression is a translation of the Latin maxim, Divide et impera ("divide and rule"), and began to appear in English about 1600.
See also: and, conquer, divide
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

divide and conquer

BRITISH & AMERICAN or

divide and rule

BRITISH
COMMON If you try to divide and conquer or divide and rule, you try to keep control over a group of people by encouraging them to argue amongst themselves. Trade unions are concerned that management may be tempted into a policy of divide and rule. The Summit sends a very strong message to him that he's not going to divide and conquer. Note: This expression has its origin in the Latin phrase `divide et impera'. It describes one of the tactics which the Romans used to rule their empire.
See also: and, conquer, divide
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

divide and conquer/rule/govern, to

To win by getting one’s opponents to fight among themselves. This strategy not only was discovered to be effective in wartime by the most ancient of adversaries, but was also applied to less concrete affairs by Jesus: “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand” (Matthew 12:25). The exact term is a translation of a Roman maxim, divide et impera (divide and rule).
See also: and, conquer, divide, rule

love conquers all

True love triumphs over adversity. This ancient adage was first stated by the Roman poet Virgil in Ciris: “Omnia vincit amor: quid enim non vinceret ille?” (Love conquers all: for what could Love not conquer?). It has been repeated ever since, by Chaucer and Tennyson, among others, but it may be obsolescent.
See also: all, conquer, love
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
How do conquered countries engage conqueror countries?
Critique: Extraordinarily 'reader friendly' in tone, commentary, organization and presentation, "How I Conquered Call Reluctance, Fear of Self-Promotion & Increased My Prospecting!" is a impressively informative read from beginning to end.
Jephthah responded by explaining that the Israelites had never fought with the Moabites directly over that territory; they had conquered it from Sihon.
The House of Tudur is acknowledged as a great dynasty and thus Wales should never be regarded as a conquered nation.
She conquered the Himalaya's Mera Peak (6,653.78 metres) in 2007, Singchuli Peak (6,501 metres) in 2008 and Makalu Peak (8,493.3 metres) in 2009.
She broke a record set by British climber Rhys Miles Jones, 20, who conquered the "seven peaks challenge" last year.
Eshkol's successor, Golda Meir, bristled at the slightest criticism from troubled advisers, and refused to confront the implications of long-term Israeli control of the conquered land.
Jihad warfare had, from the seventh century to the time of Pope Urban, conquered and Islamized what had been over half of Christendom.
Alexander founded, conquered, and/or renamed numerous cities on his long campaign.
A FOUR-year-old Ulster boy has climbed his way into the Guinness Book of Records as the youngest ever to have conquered the highest mountains in the UK.
Genghis Khan, his sons, and grandsons conquered the most densely populated areas of the 13th century, creating an empire that covered some 12 million square miles with an army that never numbered more than 100,000.
Because those who destroy are evil, we reason, they deserve to be destroyed, and because those who conquer are hateful, they deserve to be conquered by our hate.
Long at peace, Farsala is now in danger of attack by the Hrum, who have already conquered "half the known world." Much like the Romans, the Hrum have perfected the art of war but they also have laws to protect citizens and even slaves, in contrast to the Farsala, a society of "haughty, ruthless" nobles and downtrodden peasants.
One may infer from one of The World in Focus columns that the region they conquered was (a) Oceania (b) Africa (e) Asia (d) Europe.