conquer

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divide and conquer

1. To gain or maintain power by generating tension among others, especially those less powerful, so that they cannot unite in opposition. Rachel is so popular because she divides and conquers all of her minions and makes sure they all dislike each other.
2. To accomplish something by having several people work on it separately and simultaneously. The only way we'll ever get this project finished on time is if we divide and conquer. I'll put the slides together while you type up the hand-out.
See also: and, conquer, divide

I came, I saw, I conquered

Used to express one's total victory over someone or something. Often altered in various ways, as to suit the context, for humorous effect, etc. From the Latin phrase veni, vidi, vici, popularly attributed to Julius Caesar following his victory at the Battle of Zela. A: "Well, how did the interview go?" B: "I came, I saw, I conquered! You're looking at FlemCo's new Vice President of Marketing!" A: "Who won the football game?" B: "We did, by a landslide! We came, we saw, we kicked their butts!"
See also: conquer

stoop to conquer

To adopt a role, position, attitude, behavior, undertaking, etc., that is seen as being beneath one's abilities or social position in order to achieve one's end. The wealthy congressman has to start taking advantage of more popular, mainstream entertainment platforms because the only way he can come back at this point is if he stoops to conquer.
See also: conquer, stoop
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

divide and conquer

Also, divide and govern or rule . Win by getting one's opponents to fight among themselves. For example, Divide and conquer was once a very successful policy in sub-Saharan Africa. This expression is a translation of the Latin maxim, Divide et impera ("divide and rule"), and began to appear in English about 1600.
See also: and, conquer, divide
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

divide and conquer

BRITISH & AMERICAN or

divide and rule

BRITISH
COMMON If you try to divide and conquer or divide and rule, you try to keep control over a group of people by encouraging them to argue amongst themselves. Trade unions are concerned that management may be tempted into a policy of divide and rule. The Summit sends a very strong message to him that he's not going to divide and conquer. Note: This expression has its origin in the Latin phrase `divide et impera'. It describes one of the tactics which the Romans used to rule their empire.
See also: and, conquer, divide
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

divide and conquer/rule/govern, to

To win by getting one’s opponents to fight among themselves. This strategy not only was discovered to be effective in wartime by the most ancient of adversaries, but was also applied to less concrete affairs by Jesus: “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand” (Matthew 12:25). The exact term is a translation of a Roman maxim, divide et impera (divide and rule).
See also: and, conquer, divide, rule

love conquers all

True love triumphs over adversity. This ancient adage was first stated by the Roman poet Virgil in Ciris: “Omnia vincit amor: quid enim non vinceret ille?” (Love conquers all: for what could Love not conquer?). It has been repeated ever since, by Chaucer and Tennyson, among others, but it may be obsolescent.
See also: all, conquer, love
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
When alone, Tere feels conquerable, but being with Irma grants her a sense of agency that she feels unable to assert on her own.
It can also create a feeling that the market is easy to assess, as well as easily conquerable by transplanting business techniques and products that work elsewhere in the world.
Technophobia is Conquerable! retrieved 15 January, 2008, from http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Winter_2001/technophobia.html.
All the grand sources, in short, of human suffering are in a great degree, many of them almost entirely, conquerable by human care and effort; and though their removal is grievously slow--though a long succession of generations will perish in the breach before the conquest is completed, and this world becomes all that, if will and knowledge were not wanting, it might easily be made--yet every mind sufficiently intelligent and generous to bear a part, however small and inconspicuous, in the endeavour will draw a noble enjoyment from the contest itself, which he would not for any bribe in the form of selfish indulgence consent to be without.
It was characterized by despotism and resistance to progress; and since the Orient's value was judged in terms of, and in comparison to the West, it was always the "Other", the conquerable and the inferior.
Here, Surridge suggests, we are invited to police the private with Holmes and to see the non-normative as conquerable.
This shared conceptualization of space allowed for the ever-expansive mapping of the earth's territory as one (conquerable) unit.
Suddenly, we will look toward distant galaxies not merely as unreachable collections of stars but as truly conquerable frontiers.
Thus the Americas become the autoreflexive, irreducible object of European desire that, while materially conquerable, are never entirely known.
First, as we have seen, Mary's awe-inspiring effect on the speaker as an apparent model of ideal womanhood--saintly, unattainable, and chaste--is countered by his reconfiguration of her as an errant and conquerable Eve.
Counselors can present weaknesses or areas for improvement as conquerable challenges that can be mastered (Silverman, 1989; Whitmore & Maker, 1985).
When infatuation and passion are central, a couple "madly in love" perceives the entire world as a perfect paradise, one that is completely predictable and conquerable. Such fiction soon recedes when both partners realize they must resign themselves to a lifetime of reciprocal commitment and risks: for richer, for poorer; in sickness and in health.
Distance became easily conquerable. In the mental geography of e-commerce, distance has been eliminated.