con

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(with) all mod cons

(With) all the amenities of a pleasant and comfortable dwelling. "Mod cons" is an abbreviation for "modern conveniences." Primarily heard in UK. Come on, Mom, can we stay at a place with all mod cons for once? Or at least one where the power isn't constantly going off?
See also: all, con, mod

con (someone) into (something)

To trick or deceive someone into doing something. I can't believe that guy conned you into loaning him hundreds of dollars. They'll never con me into a bogus business deal!
See also: con

con (someone) out of (something)

To obtain something from someone through deception. I can't believe that shady salesman conned you out of hundreds of dollars. I'm confident that we can con that sweet old lady out of her diamond necklace.
See also: con, of, out

con artist

1. A person who exploits the vulnerability of others for their own sake by manipulating and taking advantage of their confidence (the act of which is known as a confidence trick or game). It is the common abbreviation of the full term, "confidence artist." Be wary of con artists who send emails claiming to be a bank or some other trustworthy establishment: they often ask for your personal bank details to have access to your finances.
2. By extension, a person who is skilled at duplicity, cajolery, or self-serving manipulation or persuasion. John is such a con artist, always convincing others to pay for him on nights out under the pretense that he'll "pay them back later."
See also: artist, con

con job

Something that swindles or deceives someone. That offer really was too good to be true—it turned out to be a con job that cost us thousands.
See also: con, job

con man

1. A man who exploits the vulnerability of others for his own sake by manipulating and taking advantage of their confidence (the act of which is known as a confidence trick or game). It is the common abbreviation of the full term, "confidence man." Be wary of con men who send emails claiming to be a bank or some other trustworthy establishment: they often ask for your personal bank details so as to have access to your finances.
2. By extension, a man who is skilled at duplicity, cajolery, or self-serving manipulation or persuasion. John is such a con man, always convincing others to pay for him on nights out under the pretense that he'll "pay them back later."
See also: con, man

pros and cons

The various positive ("pros") and negative ("cons") aspects of something; the advantages or disadvantages of something.. Any time I have to make a tough decision, I take a moment to consider the pros and cons. There are of course both pros and cons to this approach, but we feel that the benefits greatly outweigh the negatives.
See also: and, con, pro

put a con on (one)

To swindle, deceive, or dupe one; to exploit one through fraudulent or deceptive means. The company was caught trying to put a con on its customers by tricking them into paying for plans with higher usage fees for services that cost the company much less to provide. He's putting a con on you, Mary—he's just after your money, nothing else.
See also: con, on, put

con someone into something

to deceive someone into doing something. The dishonest contractor conned her into buying a new furnace even when her old one was fine. You are just conning yourself into believing your plan will work.
See also: con

con someone out of something

to trick someone out of money or something of value. Anne conned her little sister out of her allowance. Dave conned me out of my autographed baseball.
See also: con, of, out

confidence game

Also, confidence trick; con game. A swindle in which the victim is defrauded after his or her trust has been won. For example, The police warned of a confidence game in which people were asked to turn over valuables for a so-called appraisal , or The typical confidence trick is easy to spot if you know what to look for, or I almost let myself be taken in by her con game-she seemed so sincere. These terms, which use confidence in the sense of "trust," date from the mid-1800s. They also gave rise to confidence man (or con man) for the swindler.
See also: confidence, game

pros and cons

Arguments or considerations for and against something, as in We'd best weigh all the pros and cons before we decide to add a new wing to the library. This idiom is taken from the Latin pro for "for" and con for "against." [Late 1500s]
See also: and, con, pro

the pros and cons

the arguments for and against something; the advantages and disadvantages of something.
Pro is Latin for ‘for’; con is an abbreviation of Latin contra , meaning ‘against’.
See also: and, con, pro

(with) all mod ˈcons

(British English, informal) used to describe a house or flat/apartment that has all the things that make living there easier and more comfortable, for example a washing machine, a shower, etc: From the outside it looks rather old, but inside it’s got all mod cons — even a microwave oven.We want a campsite with all mod cons.
This phrase is a short form of ‘modern conveniences’.
See also: all, con, mod

the ˌpros and ˈcons (of something)

the arguments for and against something; the advantages and disadvantages (of something): Your idea is interesting, but let’s look carefully at its pros and cons before we take any decisions.This expression comes from the Latin words pro, meaning ‘for’, and contra, meaning ‘against’.
See also: and, con, pro

con

1. n. a convict. Is that guy in the gray pajamas one of the escaped cons?
2. n. a confidence scheme. They pulled a real con on the old lady.
3. tv. to swindle or deceive someone. Don’t try to con me. I know the score.

con job

n. an act of deception. This is not an annual report! It’s a con job!
See also: con, job

con man

and con artist
n. someone who makes a living by swindling people. Gary is a con artist, but at least he’s not on the dole. I was taken by a real con man!
See also: con, man

con artist

verb
See also: artist, con

put a con on someone

tv. to attempt to deceive someone; to attempt to swindle someone. (Underworld.) Don’t try to put a con on me, Buster! I’ve been around too long.
See also: con, on, put, someone
References in periodicals archive ?
Conner. "I feel like I was given a new lease on life and I want to keep spreading the message that there is a way up and out of addiction."
What we found in Conner is not only a great deal economically for our client, but a great cultural fit to ensure the legacy of RoseMill continues on.
Anybody wishing to donate to the fund can either donate through local collection points such as Llandrindod Wells Post Office or through JustGiving, and by putting in Conner's name.
Conner, of Mansionhouse Road, Paisley, has been ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work in 12 months.
Lord Arthurson had been told by defence advocate Tony Graham QC that the girl had "acknowledged" how her actions had caused "devastation" and had deprived Conner's family of their loved one.
She told jurors: "He was a nice person." It was claimed Conner was being "flirty" with her at the party but she was not interested.
Conner was admitted to the intensive care unit with swelling of the brain, a haemorrhage in his eyes, and a cut to his forehead.
She said Conner's "attitude changed" and he later started rowing with her.
Conner has exceeded all expectations this year as the replacement for Le'Veon Bell, who can't play in 2018 after refusing to show up to Pittsburgh for the first three months of the season.
But Braddon attacked Conner after taking cocaine, Valium and drinking alcohol.
"We do quite a bit with the Times, and we thought this contest was a neat idea to be a part of," says Diane Conner, marketing manager at K&K Hardware.
Conner Collins spent 12-and-a-half hours in surgery earlier this week having two thirds of his right lung removed after falling ill last year.
Her son Conner Duckworth, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) - a genetic disorder which causes progressive muscle degeneration - first started getting support from the charity when he was just a six-years-old in 2004.
Conner Byrne made his first team bow in the semi-final of the Mid Ulster Cup - at the age of just 14 years and 245 days.
BOILERMAN James Conner was condemned to death for the murder of James Gaffney on August 11, 1873.