conjecture

(redirected from conjecturally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

conjecture on (something)

To speculate or wonder about something. A murmur went through the stands as people conjectured on which dog would be named the winner.
See also: conjecture, on

conjecture on something

to speculate on or guess about something. I will not even conjecture on the outcome. Dave conjectured on what might happen next.
See also: conjecture, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, I have highly conjecturally tied the baths and the pool portrayed in the poem with the rite of baptism, i.
2) (25) and, as the latest datable object, a Rhodian amphora handle naming the eponym Philokrates--the same eponym conjecturally restored on the Group B amphora.
1902; Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967), who ascribes it conjecturally to Lyly, although he also ascribes to Lyly almost all occasional entertainments written in England in Lyly's lifetime.
owners were only conjecturally related to the complex social problem of
Conjecturally, investors should periodically rebalance their portfolios to keep small percentages of 5 to 10 percent of their holdings in gold investments to offset the volatility of the broader stock market due to gold's tendency in the opposite direction.
Conjecturally, it can, therefore, be inferred that the median age of the Nepali youths during the Jana Andolan in 1990 was the crucial factor for the mass upheaval.
Permit me here also to respond to Alexander Cockburn's January 13/20 column, which misrepresented my position on the Democratic 2004 nomination for President, conjecturally and mistakenly attributing to me a preference for Gore.
Mary is portrayed reading a book, understood to be a prayer book or the Bible, conjecturally the prophetic Book of Isaiah.
I speak conjecturally about the manner in which Sewell would have articulated a theory of complicity because, even though Dimock and others speak confidently about his doctrine, readers never hear what Sewell actually says in his sermon on "Complicity.
Lakatos (1974) writes that a person who takes a falsificationist approach to the validation of statements is a methodological-falsificationist (rather than a dogmatist falsificationist) if he or she takes the view that all statements--including 'observation-statements'--are open to further questioning and criticism; or, in other words, that all statements are to be taken conjecturally, rather than dispositively.
Sweetser, conjecturally assigned to 1858, has two kinds of paragraph marker: the "reverse" indentation I have just described and a more conventional indent marking the start of a paragraph about t wo-thirds of the way down the third page of the letter (Ll90).
Deviance is addressed either conjecturally, in unsystematic reference to a few actual cases, or as desiderata for future research.
For example, in their Textual Companion, they purport to have conjecturally reconstructed from the 1604-05 Quarto of Hamlet the form in which a passage stood in Shakespeare's autograph manuscript (p.
None of the four other editions/issues of this work in the ESTC dated or conjecturally dated between 1726 and 1760 has any advertisements for The Coronation.
With King Lear, of course, there is another text with which to compare the Quarto; but even if the Folio text of Lear did not exist, it would be possible to correct Q's 'gross mistakes' conjecturally in most cases, whereas those in Pericles seem to me different in kind, not simple mistakes so much as more general absurdities, to which conjectures cannot restore good sense.