a confidence game

(redirected from confidence games)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

a confidence game

A method of inspiring someone's trust and then deceiving them. Don't fall for Tony's sad story—he's known for playing confidence games.
See also: confidence, game

confidence game

Also, confidence trick; con game. A swindle in which the victim is defrauded after his or her trust has been won. For example, The police warned of a confidence game in which people were asked to turn over valuables for a so-called appraisal , or The typical confidence trick is easy to spot if you know what to look for, or I almost let myself be taken in by her con game-she seemed so sincere. These terms, which use confidence in the sense of "trust," date from the mid-1800s. They also gave rise to confidence man (or con man) for the swindler.
See also: confidence, game
References in periodicals archive ?
typical sort of confidence game at all levels of society.
political calculation made in the confidence game played in
Unlike the other recently released book about money and markets being reviewed in this issue, Confidence Games is not a protest against the erosion of meanings and values in today's society.
Basically, Confidence Games announces the new development and warns us not to resist it.
28); and two, that Melville's aesthetics of repose compelled him to experiment, as he participated in the "debate over how humor and satire could best serve the republic," with the conflicting forms of genial and subversive laughter found in "tall tales and literary confidence games" (p.
Confidence games and bad checks, except forgeries and counterfeiting, are included.
Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.
The naturalist obsession with the paradox of human freedom that drives the work of these writers appears again at the heart of Parks's play, and once again money and the confidence game are at the center of that obsession.
In the struggle for power at the center of Topdog/Underdog, Booth needs to believe that his skill with the confidence game of three-card monte equals or even exceeds that of his older brother Lincoln, a one-time master of the con who has given up the game after the violent death of one of his "crew." Yet evidence suggests Booth lacks Lincoln's innate skill.