confide


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confide in (one)

To share one's secrets with someone, usually a trusted person unlikely to divulge them. Of course you can confide in me—I'm your best friend! This issue is just so embarrassing that I can't possibly confide in anyone about it.
See also: confide

confide in someone

to trust someone with one's secrets or personal matters. Sally always confided in her sister Ann. She didn't feel that she could confide in her mother.
See also: confide

confide something in someone

 and confide something to someone
to tell a secret or private matter to someone, trusting that the person will not reveal the secret. I learned not to confide anything secret in Bob. Tom really needed to confide his inner fears to someone.
See also: confide
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, the testimony of GO staff indicates any communications relating to public business transmitted over Confide fell within the scope of Series 21532, and thus those messages did not fall within the scope of Series 21530 or 21531.
"While there's a lot of technology under the hood that makes ScreenShield possible, the great news is that there are no strange gimmicks for users (e.g., it doesn't require them to hold their finger on the screen)AaAaAeAc-AaAa just works as expected," Confide said in a post about the new technology.
En revanche, aucun moyen de verifier soi-meme les propos de Confide puisque le code source de l'application n'est pas disponible au public.
If you haven't such a person you can confide in, turn first to God and then to your minister.
"After a year on the market the usage level of Confide is quite low," said Robert Miller, president of Direct Access Diagnostics, in announcing the withdrawal of the product from the market.
Confide, another encrypted messaging app that allows users to send temporary messages to one another, (https://www.axios.com/confide-the-new-app-for-paranoid-republicans-2246297664.html) gained popularity among White House staffers earlier this year, though may have fallen out of favor after (http://www.ibtimes.com/confide-private-research-shows-app-was-vulnerable-attack-2504982) reports of major security flaws that plagued the app and (https://www.wired.com/2017/02/white-house-encryption-confide-app/) questions about the legality of government officials conducting business through a service that does not preserve communications.
That program, however, may not happen soon, officials confide. Right now, the Division of General Services sells commercial property outright at auction and the new policies do not appear to change that at this time.
End-to-end encryption app Confide, which is used by staff at the White House, has been hit with a lawsuit for failing to deliver promised security features, (https://www.scribd.com/document/345796535/Auman-v-Confide-Filed-Complaint?irgwc=1&content=10079&campaign=Skimbit%2C%20Ltd.&ad_group=&keyword=ft750noi&source=impactradius&medium=affiliate) documents uploaded by (https://www.recode.net/2017/4/20/15374002/confide-screenshot-lawsuit-secure-messaging) Recode show.
I'M SCARED TO CONFIDE IN MY MUM Dear Coleen I FIND it hard to confide in my mum.
Fearing the worst, and convinced his ticker might pack up at any second, he's too scared to confide in Gail but tells a sympathetic Eileen who insists on going to the hospital with him.
Finally she feels she has someone she can confide in.
London, June 15 (ANI): It has emerged that two thirds of Britons confide in their colleagues rather then their loved ones.
He gradually befriends an older man named Bert, who takes care of the homing pigeons that accompany every flight, and finds that he can confide in him.
COUPLES in close relationships face less risk of further heart attacks than those with no-one to confide in, new research suggests.