conduct

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conduct (someone or something) away

To move someone or something away from someone or something else. Go out and conduct the kids away from the pool. I was quick to conduct the dog away from the stray cat.
See also: away, conduct

conduct (someone or something) into (some place)

To move or lead someone or something into a particular place or area. Can you conduct the kids into the house for birthday cake? I was quick to conduct the dog into the house when I noticed the stray cat.
See also: conduct

conduct (someone or something) out of (some place)

To move or lead someone or something out of a particular place or area. Can you conduct the kids out of the house for relay races? Once the stray cat was gone, I conducted the dog out of the house for a walk.
See also: conduct, of, out

conduct in

To direct, lead, or guide someone or something into a particular place or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "conduct" and "in." Could you please you conduct everyone in for the performance? A guard stood conducting in cars after checking their security clearance.
See also: conduct

conduct out

1. To direct, lead, or guide someone or something out of a particular place or area. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "conduct" and "out." The teacher conducted his students out of the room. Security personnel began conducting us out of the building.
2. To undertake or carry out something. I think we should conduct out our own research. The government has committed to conducting out a review of its current policy.
See also: conduct, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

conduct someone away (from someone or something)

to lead someone away from someone or something. The usher conducted the gentleman away from the front of the auditorium. Can you conduct Fred away from the area? Please conduct him away.
See also: away, conduct

conduct someone into something

 and conduct someone in
to lead someone into something or some place. The usher conducted the gentleman into the hall. The host was pleased to conduct in the guest of honor.
See also: conduct

conduct someone out of something

 and conduct someone out
to lead someone out of something or some place. The usher conducted the gentleman out of the hall. The cop conducted out the gang of rowdy youths.
See also: conduct, of, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
For it occurred to me that I should find much more truth in the reasonings of each individual with reference to the affairs in which he is personally interested, and the issue of which must presently punish him if he has judged amiss, than in those conducted by a man of letters in his study, regarding speculative matters that are of no practical moment, and followed by no consequences to himself, farther, perhaps, than that they foster his vanity the better the more remote they are from common sense; requiring, as they must in this case, the exercise of greater ingenuity and art to render them probable.
"Well," said Tom, with cold scorn, "if your feelings are so much better than mine, let me see you show them in some other way than by conduct that's likely to disgrace us all,--than by ridiculous flights first into one extreme and then into another.
'It is only of a piece with the rest of his conduct,' observed Mr.
Yes, delighted; though I was angered by Arthur's conduct, and though I felt that he had wronged me, and was determined he should feel it too.
These conducted her through the doorway which the blacks, pulling upon heavy chains, closed behind them.
It was fully fifteen minutes before he returned, when the guard was again changed and the girl conducted into the chamber beyond.
Through three other chambers and past three more massive doors, at each of which her guard was changed, the girl was conducted before she was ushered into a comparatively small room, back and forth across the floor of which paced a man in a scarlet tunic, upon the front and back of which was embroidered an enormous parrot and upon whose head was a barbaric headdress surmounted by a stuffed parrot.
Frank Churchill to be making such a speech as that to the uncle and aunt, who have brought him up, and are to provide for him!Standing up in the middle of the room, I suppose, and speaking as loud as he could!How can you imagine such conduct practicable?"
There was a time when we were told that breaches, by the States, of the regulations of the federal authority were not to be expected; that a sense of common interest would preside over the conduct of the respective members, and would beget a full compliance with all the constitutional requisitions of the Union.
"Yes, madame, it is the custom, not from gallantry but prudence, that in time of war foreigners should be conducted to particular hotels, in order that they may remain under the eye of the government until full information can be obtained about them."
At the end of a quarter of an hour, however, surprised at the length of the journey, she leaned forward toward the door to see whither she was being conducted. Houses were no longer to be seen; trees appeared in the darkness like great black phantoms chasing one another.
I received orders to go and take charge of you on the sea, and to conduct you to this castle.
Bloomfield were not the only guests whose coming to Wellwood House annoyed me; every visitor disturbed me more or less; not so much because they neglected me (though I did feel their conduct strange and disagreeable in that respect), as because I found it impossible to keep my pupils away from them, as I was repeatedly desired to do: Tom must talk to them, and Mary Ann must be noticed by them.
I strained every nerve to do so: by striving to amuse them, I endeavoured to attract them to my side; by the exertion of such authority as I possessed, and by such severity as I dared to use, I tried to deter them from tormenting the guests; and by reproaching their unmannerly conduct, to make them ashamed to repeat it.
She assured me that my character and general conduct were unexceptionable; but the children had made so little improvement since my arrival that Mr.