condescend to

condescend to

To act as though others are less important or inferior to oneself. Jim has been condescending to us ever since he found out he got cast in that movie. Can you please stop condescending to me? Contrary to what you may think, I'm not an idiot.
See also: condescend

condescend to (do something)

To do something that one feels is unworthy or demeaning. Now that Jim thinks he's a big movie star, I doubt he'll condescend to talk to us common folk.
See also: condescend

condescend to someone

to talk down to someone; to treat people as if they were below oneself; to patronize someone. Please do not condescend to me. There is no need to condescend to the children. They are just small, not stupid.
See also: condescend
References in classic literature ?
He had condescended to mortgage as far as he had the power, but he would never condescend to sell.
Falk obeys the law of self-preservation without the slightest misgivings as to his right, but at a crucial turn of that ruthlessly preserved life he will not condescend to dodge the truth.
"Will your majesty," said Gaston, "condescend to occupy this apartment, all unworthy as it is to receive you?"
Ms Pelosi was reportedly so offended by members of the group that she turned to Mr Francois and said: "Don't condescend to me or to us."
Not only that he can't even condescend to reply to my letter dated March, 24 when I pointed this out.
1 : to stoop to the level of someone considered less important <These two great commanders did not condescend to fight in person .
Surely, the greater surprise is that a government which for the last 10 years has been so adept in representing the interests of those living within the M25 and north of the border should condescend to actually having one minister from the West Midlands.
They made fun of the "old trolls," as they insisted on calling them, although they would condescend to let them buy us drinks.
Regular readers of CTR are aware of our editorial stance that, in information technology, applications are king and will not condescend to any lesser role.
For he did not condescend to the objects of his desire; he knew them as people and gave them human identities in his art.
Cricket's one-day world champions are fuming that England still only condescend to give them a one-off Test.
So-and-so's writing speaks out against racism.'" "Failures or refusal to acknowledge complexity among writers from socially marginalized groups," Mackey argues, "no matter how 'well-intentioned,' condescend to the work and to the writers and thus, hardly the solution they purport to be, are a part of the problem." Mackey contends that such interpretations have dominated literary criticism about nearly all "marginalized" writers, resulting in insufficient attention being paid to the "variance and divergent approaches" inherent in the work of a wide range of authors whose writing "defies canons of accessibility" (18).
That means you can t condescend to your reader about how the real meaning of pride is an adorable and eccentric boyfriend, a cabin in the Poconos, and an adopted child (and a six-figure salary to support all three).