condense


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condense (something) (in)to (something)

To reduce something into fewer parts, or to make something smaller or shorter. You definitely need to condense this paper into a shorter version because you're currently 20 pages over the limit.
See also: condense

condense something (in)to something

to compress or reduce something to something; to shrink or abridge something into a smaller version. Condense this into half its original volume. You should condense this novel to a short story.
See also: condense
References in periodicals archive ?
Why can the government not legislate to make "condensing" boilers condense? This would increase by some 15% to 20% the effective energy output of even the most efficient domestic boilers and produce significant reductions in energy consumption, costs and carbon emissions.
As these materials condense, they produce the visible smoke from this process.
The vents close and the steam condenses, and when it condenses, it shrinks back to 1/1700 the volume it occupied as steam.
The presence of flames tends to consume the organic materials that otherwise would condense within the hood, duct and collection system.
As a result, the winds off these pastures must rise farther up the Cordillera de Tilaran slopes before clouds condense.
That cooling increases the rate at which moisture in the rising air condenses (to form rain).
Through tank or heat exchange surface modifications, condensing water heaters extract more sensible heat from the combustion gas, lowering the temperature enough to cause moisture to condense out of the combustion gases, thus capturing a significant portion of the latent heat energy.
Chapman and his colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta have slashed the time to condense a gas of already chilled atoms to about 2 seconds.
Having the lowest mass of any element, it was expected to condense at the highest temperature.
However, larger clusters of gas and dust would have had enough gravity to overcome this thermal pressure and eventually condense into galaxies.
Whitesides of Harvard University and Amit Kumar of the Idetek Corp., in Sunnyvale, Calif., describe a technique for stamping a pattern onto a thin film that allows small droplets of liquid to condense in ordered arrays.
The difficulty lies in understanding how solar prominences condense from the sun's corona.
SOGS "is not smart enough," he says, to condense a lengthy observation or to expand a short one so that it fits into the 95 minutes of observation time available during a single orbit.