condemn (someone) to (something)

(redirected from condemned to)

condemn (someone) to (something)

To assign one a particular fate or punishment. That criminal has been condemned to a life of hard labor.
See also: condemn

condemn someone to something

[for a judge] to sentence someone to something; to relegate someone to a particular punishment. By confessing, he condemned himself to many years in prison. I don't want to condemn you to a life of unpleasantness.
See also: condemn
References in classic literature ?
burn the poor devils who are only condemned to be hung?
that "stern and just man," as Maurice Baring calls him) this was enough, and he was condemned to death.
She remembered that she had been condemned to death for murder committed on the person of Phoebus de Châteaupers.
And then, it was touching to behold this protection which had fallen from a being so hideous upon a being so unhappy, a creature condemned to death saved by Quasimodo.
The young priest was condemned to ten years of imprisonment, and to be branded.
The day after my return to Lille, my brother in his turn succeeded in making his escape; I was accused of complicity, and was condemned to remain in his place till he should be again a prisoner.
KARACHI -- Shafqat Hussain, a prisoner condemned to death by an anti-terrorism court, for abduction and murder of a seven year child in 2004, was hanged on Tuesday morning at the Karachi Central Prison.
Condemned to death sentence fifteen years ago, the convicts were enjoying the immunity due to an unannounced moratorium on execution in Pakistan.
Earlier, Muhammad Afzal, the elder brother of two men who were also condemned to death by the jirga, had claimed that the 'condemned' women had been slaughtered and that there were eyewitnesses to the incident.
1 : to cause to suffer or live in difficult or unpleasant conditions <She was condemned to spend her summer in a cast.
Speaking of forgiveness, what of the opportunity for the condemned to be forgiven for their crimes in the eyes of God?
Although usually two hours long, today's yard barely lasts ten minutes, for fear that those condemned to death by the state may perish, instead, by fate.
Charles Walker, also condemned to death for murder, looks at it a little differently.
Many good people today claim that, had they been in Jerusalem at the time of Jesus' trial, they would not have allowed Jesus to be condemned to death.
It has ruled that solid evidence of innocence can be considered irrelevant to the case of a prisoner condemned to death.