concrete

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Related to concreteness: coherence

concrete jungle

An overcrowded, unsafe and/or crime-ridden urban environment or city, characterized by the congestion of large buildings and roads. After years living in that concrete jungle, I'm looking forward to being in a place with a bit of grass and friendly neighbors.
See also: concrete, jungle

be cast in concrete

To be firmly or permanently established; to be unalterable or not subject to change. The healthcare law looks promising, but we'll have to wait until it's cast in concrete before we know exactly what it will do.
See also: cast, concrete

cast in concrete

Firmly or permanently established; not subject to change; unalterable. The healthcare law looks promising, but we'll have to wait until it's cast in concrete before we know exactly what it will do.
See also: cast, concrete

set (something) in concrete

To establish something firmly or permanently; to make something unalterable or not subject to change. The healthcare law looks promising, but we'll have to wait until Congress sets it in concrete before we know exactly what it will do.
See also: concrete, set

be set in concrete

To be definitely and permanently decided or planned. We might get brunch next weekend, but nothing is set in concrete yet.
See also: concrete, set

set in concrete

If a plan is set in concrete, it is fixed and cannot be changed. With expenditure plans now set in concrete for three years, slower growth would mean higher taxes. Note: You can also say that a plan is cast in concrete. But the sale conditions must be cast in concrete.
See also: concrete, set

be set in concrete

(of a policy or idea) be fixed and unalterable.
See also: concrete, set
References in periodicals archive ?
130) The majority opinion used an overbroad conception of Lujan, ignoring its limited holding that the concreteness requirement must remain in suits against the government, (131) The plaintiffs in Lujan relied on a statute that authorized anyone to bring a lawsuit based on the government's failure to follow a correct procedure.
Hypothesis 1: The concreteness effect will occur in both word and sentence contexts when processing emotionally neutral information.
We asked an additional group of 65 students to rate concreteness on a 1 to 7 scale.
This metacognitive approach to TOTs may explain how word concreteness contributes to the phenomenological experience of TOT states.
The hypothesis is derived from the research by Sadoski, Goetz and Rodriguez (2000) who found strong connections between concreteness ratings and interest ratings.
Another feature of Alter's translation is his attention to the concreteness (one might even say earthiness) of Hebrew in general and the Psalter in particular.
Second, in myth we experience imaginatively, in the concreteness of the story, something which would be abstract if translated out.
Frost conjures his local flora, fauna, and folk with a wryly loving concreteness that can speak directly to anyone who takes the time to listen.
The dramatic concreteness is the reader's guarantee that the overall experience of the book is not merely incoherent, while its constantly shifting perspectives and ambivalent motives make it impossible to know quite what it is that the book knows.
According to a book published recently ( Made to Stick; Why Some Ideas Take Hold and Others Come Unstuck), ideas that stick have the following characteristics; simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility and emotional appeal.
The historical concreteness of the res Catholica is subordinated to the absolute goal, the "Vision of an egalitarian utopia.
His examples and explanations revealed a strong desire for concreteness and an irritation with abstract or fuzzy generalizations or statements.
These are summarized by the acronym SUCCES: simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotional and stories.
It is to remind us that both art and life begin in the immediacy and concreteness of the local," Wolfe writes.