conclusion


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foregone conclusion

1. An inevitable result. After how poorly the team has played so far this season, it's a foregone conclusion that they won't make it to the championship.
2. A view or belief that one has before receiving all pertinent information. Don't come to any foregone conclusions about the accident, all right? Let me tell you the whole story first.
See also: conclusion, foregone

bring (something) to a successful conclusion

To complete something with a positive or favorable outcome. Although we struggled to finish the presentation on time, we were able to bring it to a successful conclusion.

come to a/the conclusion

1. To make a determination about someone or something. The jury came to the conclusion that the defendant is guilty.
2. To reach an end point. If there are no other issues to discuss, then this meeting can come to a conclusion. That play's lengthy run on Broadway comes to a conclusion tonight.
See also: come, conclusion

in conclusion

In summary; as the final, concluding point. In conclusion, if we do not address this issue now, it will become insurmountable in a few years' time.
See also: conclusion

jump to conclusions

To make decisions or form opinions before one has all the pertinent facts. I know you found some suspicious things in her office, but don't jump to conclusions—talk to her first.
See also: conclusion, jump

try conclusions with (someone)

old-fashioned To engage someone in a battle or contest. She quickly proved to be an exceptionally talented wrestler, willing to try a fall with anyone from the surrounding areas. It has become clear following their decision to support this horrible agenda that the government dare not try conclusions with our neighbors up north.
See also: conclusion, try

reach a conclusion

To achieve some conclusion, especially after a period of deliberation, discussion, debate, etc. We've been turning over the evidence for nearly three days, and we're still no closer to reaching any conclusions! After spending the last few nights thinking about what you said, I've come to the conclusion that I need to make some drastic changes in my life.
See also: conclusion, reach

rush to conclusions

To draw conclusions, make decisions, or form opinions before one has all the pertinent facts. I know you found some suspicious things in her office, but don't rush to conclusions—talk to her first. I must apologize for rushing to conclusions earlier. I should have given you the benefit of the doubt.
See also: conclusion, rush

leap to conclusions

To make decisions or form opinions before one has all the pertinent facts. I know you found some suspicious things in her office, but don't leap to conclusions—talk to her first and see if she has a reasonable explanation. You're always leaping to conclusions whenever I make the slightest criticism of our relationship!
See also: conclusion, leap

bring something to a successful conclusion

to complete something successfully. They brought the battle to a successful conclusion. The case was brought to a successful conclusion by the prosecutor.

come to a conclusion

 
1. to reach a decision. We talked for a long time but never came to any conclusion. Can we come to a conclusion today, or do we have to meet again?
2. [for a process] to reach the end and be finished. At last, the yearlong ordeal of buying a house came to a conclusion. I was afraid that the opera would never come to a conclusion.
See also: come, conclusion

foregone conclusion

Cliché a conclusion already reached; an inevitable result. That the company was moving to California was a foregone conclusion. That the mayor will win reelection is a foregone conclusion.
See also: conclusion, foregone

jump to conclusions

 and leap to conclusions
Fig. to judge or decide something without having all the facts; to reach unwarranted conclusions. (See also rush to conclusions.) Now don't jump to conclusions. Wait until you hear what I have to say. Please find out all the facts so you won't leap to conclusions.
See also: conclusion, jump

reach a conclusion

to complete discussion and decide an issue. It took three days of talks to reach a conclusion. When we reach a conclusion, we will notify you of the results.
See also: conclusion, reach

rush to conclusions

to try to reach a conclusion too fast, probably with insufficient evidence; to jump to conclusions. I hope that you don't rush to any conclusions. I can explain this. I'm afraid you are rushing to conclusions when you speak of canceling the performance.
See also: conclusion, rush

foregone conclusion, a

1. An outcome regarded as inevitable, as in The victory was a foregone conclusion.
2. A conclusion formed in advance of argument or consideration, as in The jury was warned to consider all of the evidence and not base their decision on a foregone conclusion . This idiom probably was invented by Shakespeare ( Othello, 3:3) but scholars are not agreed as to his precise meaning. [c. 1600]
See also: foregone

jump to a conclusion

Form an opinion or judgment hastily, as in Wait till you have the facts; don't jump to a conclusion. [c. 1700]
See also: conclusion, jump

jump to conclusions

COMMON If someone jumps to conclusions, they decide too quickly that something is true, when they do not know all the facts. Forgive me. I shouldn't be jumping to conclusions. Note: You can also say that someone jumps to a conclusion. I didn't want her to jump to the conclusion that the divorce was in any way her fault. Note: People sometimes use leap instead of jump. The medical establishment was careful not to leap to conclusions.
See also: conclusion, jump

try conclusions with

engage in a trial of skill or argument with. formal
1902 G. S. Whitmore The Last Maori War in New Zealand Te Kooti 's prestige enormously increased by an apparent unwillingness to try conclusions with him, even with an immensely superior force and in the open plains.
See also: conclusion, try

jump (or leap) to conclusions (or the conclusion that)

form an opinion hastily, before you have learned or considered all the facts.
See also: conclusion, jump

jump/leap to conˈclusions

make a decision about somebody/something too quickly, before you know or have thought about all the facts: There you go again — jumping to conclusions. Wait till you hear my side of the story!
See also: conclusion, jump, leap

a ˌforegone conˈclusion

a result that is certain to happen: It’s a foregone conclusion that Spain will win tonight’s match.
See also: conclusion, foregone

foregone conclusion, a

A result that is already known and therefore is taken for granted. The term comes from Shakespeare’s Othello (3.3), in which, after hearing Iago’s lie about Cassio talking in his sleep of his love affair with Desdemona, Othello says this “dream” is a “foregone conclusion”—that is, it clearly denotes that his wife has been unfaithful to him with Cassio (as Iago intended him to believe all along). Some four centuries later the term is still around: “But it could be argued that it was a surprise so many Spaniards were prepared to take part in a vote which was a foregone conclusion” (Economist, Feb. 26, 2005).
See also: foregone

jump to conclusions, to

To draw inferences too hastily from insufficient evidence. Also put in the singular (to jump to a conclusion), this cliché dates from about 1700.
See also: jump
References in periodicals archive ?
Dodik thinks that the adoption of this conclusion by the BiH Presidency "on the same day when the Agreement on the construction of a bridge on the Sava River near GradiA!ka was signed, indicates that the damage is trying to be inflicted not only to Croatia, but indirectly it will jeopardize the bridge project on the Sava River near GradiA!ka, which of vital interest for RS".
Conclusion Should run his race again but given his record, he is not one to put too much faith in at a short price.
Titanium complexes--5 ingredients--Split conclusion (1 safe with qualifications; 4 insufficient)
Mas papaniwalaan ko ang ating gobyerno kesa sa taong dumating na lang dito at nagsasalita na may conclusion agad even in the absence of a formal investigation,' he added.
Conclusion - There was evidence that Diana's Mercedes made a "glancing blow" with a white Fiat Uno in the underpass.
If all the evidence supports this working hypothesis, the investigator can convert it to a final hypothesis, moving the investigation expeditiously to a conclusion.
Comprehension of statistical methods will give the student the opportunity to understand previous and current research, generate their own research, evaluate practice, and draw informed conclusions about their clients.
* The need to document a conclusion not readily determinable from the documentation.
The NAS/NRC report reviewing the DTSE & E's study concluded that "in addition to providing examples of cost savings and cost avoidance that resulted from the use of M & S in acquisition, the study reinforced some of the conclusions and recommendations of prior studies." However, no other results were noted.
* Generally, advice that does not resolve a federal tax issue in the taxpayer's favor, unless the advice reaches a conclusion favorable to the taxpayer at any confidence level.
The Fathers of the Church, the past Popes, before Vatican II, also having access to the same texts of the Bible, arrived at another conclusion. They did not use the expression "for all" in the words of the consecration, and that for thousands of years.
1 believe the study has serious flaws and that their conclusion is premature.
(18) A practitioner giving advice in a covered opinion must consider all relevant facts, relate applicable law to relevant facts, evaluate the significant federal tax issues, and provide an overall conclusion. (19)
Upon further investigation, the fallacy of the logic used to arrive at the conclusion that a particular house has a problem becomes apparent.