compete

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Related to competes: sort out, outscoring, outperforms

compete against (someone or something)

To work or put forth effort against someone or something in an attempt to do something successfully. I'm probably competing against a hundred people for this job. Instead of competing against the loud music out here, let's go inside and talk.
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compete for (someone or something)

To work or put forth effort against someone or something in an attempt to gain someone or something else. I refuse to compete for a guy's affections—if he likes someone more than me, then I need to move on. I'm feeling discouraged now that I know just how many people are competing for this job.
See also: compete

compete in (something)

To participate in a competition. Who is competing in this heat?
See also: compete

compete with (someone or something)

To work or put forth effort against someone or something. How many people am I competing with for this job? Instead of competing with the loud music out here, let's go inside and talk.
See also: compete

compete against someone

to contend against someone; to play against someone in a game or contest. I don't see how I can compete against all of them. She refused to compete against her own brothers.
See also: compete

compete against something

to struggle against something; to seem to be in a contest with something. It was hard to be heard. I was competing against the noise of construction. Please stop talking. I do not wish to compete against the audience when I lecture.
See also: compete

compete for someone or something

to contend against or contest [someone] for someone or something; to struggle for someone or something [against a competitor]. They are competing for a lovely prize. Ed and Roger are competing for Alice's attention.
See also: compete

compete in something

to enter into a competition. I do not want to compete in that contest. Ann looked forward to competing in the race.
See also: compete

compete with someone or something

to contend against someone, something, or a group; to play in a competition against someone, something, or a group. I can't compete with all this noise. We always compete closely with our crosstown rivals, Adams High School.
See also: compete
References in periodicals archive ?
It is many of the larger foundries that have closed in light of their inability to compete head-to-head with business from overseas, he notes.
Herta, who won two races on the CART Series, both at Laguna Seca in Monterey, will compete for the Panoz Motor Sports team in the 10-race American Le Mans Series, which starts March 16 with the 50th anniversary of the 12 Hours of Sebring at Sebring International Raceway in Florida.
His team also will compete in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June in France, which is not a points race in the American Le Mans Series.
She won't compete at the Southern Section individuals this year because only the top-two finishers in the league individual tournament qualify.
Corless has developed all the tools she'll need to compete at the collegiate level.
But more than that it was about being able to compete.
Nearly 100 senior citizens - some in wheelchairs, some with walkers - from six convalescent hospitals and retirement homes gathered Wednesday at Lancaster City Park's Stanley Kleiner Center to compete in the eighth annual Mobility is Freedom Games.
O'Brien, the world record-holder in the decathlon, will also compete in the long jump.
Mary Slaney and Sandra Farmer-Patrick, both suspended by track and field's international governing body for alleged drug use, decided Monday night to compete in this week's USA Track and Field Championships.
Athletes compete at local, area and regional events on a year-round basis.
Putting their equestrian skills to the test on Sunday, students from 30 Southland high schools will compete in the first of four events that make up the Los Angeles division of the Interscholastic Equestrian League.
States differ on whether continued employment is sufficient consideration to support a promise not to compete where the employment is employment at-will, since the employer can terminate employment at its discretion.