compare

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Related to compares: compares notes

be as nothing (compared) to (someone or something)

To be unimportant or trivial compared to someone or something else. These new pieces are as nothing compared to his groundbreaking early works.
See also: nothing

beyond compare

Unequalled or peerless. I'm not surprised that Molly won that scholarship—her intelligence is beyond compare.
See also: beyond, compare

beyond comparison

Unequalled or peerless. I'm not surprised that Molly won a full scholarship to that prestigious university—her intelligence is beyond comparison.
See also: beyond, comparison

compare (someone or something) to (someone or something)

To highlight the similarities between two people or things. Well, if Shakespeare can compare someone to a summer's day, then so can I! Unfortunately, I can only compare her performance to a train wreck.
See also: compare

compare (someone or something) with (someone or something)

To highlight the similarities between two people or things. Well, if Shakespeare can compare someone with a summer's day, then so can I! Unfortunately, I can only compare her performance with a train wreck.
See also: compare

compare apples and oranges

To try to highlight the similarities between two different things—which typically cannot be done. You can't compare your job as a nurse to mine as an engineer—that's comparing apples and oranges!
See also: and, apple, compare, orange

compare apples to oranges

To compare two unlike things or people. Stop comparing apples to oranges—those two companies you're talking about are completely different.
See also: apple, compare, orange

compare notes

To discuss one's feelings on or experience of someone or something with another person. This afternoon, we'll have to compare notes on the applicants we've interviewed so far.
See also: compare, note

compare notes on (someone or something)

To discuss one's feelings on or experience of someone or something with another person. This afternoon, we'll have to compare notes on the applicants we've interviewed so far.
See also: compare, note, on

without compare

Unequalled or peerless. I'm not surprised that Molly won that scholarship—her intelligence is without compare.
See also: compare, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

compare notes on someone or something

to share observations on someone or something. We took a little time to compare notes on our ancestors and have discovered that we are cousins.
See also: compare, note, on

compare someone or something to someone or something

to liken people or things to other people or things; to say that some people or things have the same qualities as other people or things. (See the comment at compare someone or something with someone or something.) l can only compare him to a cuddly teddy bear. He compared himself to one of the knights of the round table.
See also: compare

compare someone or something with someone or something

to consider the sameness or difference of sets of things or people. (This phrase is very close in meaning to compare someone or something to someone or something, but for some connotes stronger contrast.) Let's compare the virtues of savings accounts with investing in bonds. When I compare Roger with Tom, I find very few similarities. Please compare Tom with Bill on their unemployment records.
See also: compare
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

beyond comparison

Also, without comparison or beyond compare . Too superior to be compared, unrivaled, as in This view of the mountains is beyond comparison, or That bakery is without comparison. The first term, more common today than the much older variants, was first recorded in 1871. Without comparison goes back to 1340, and without compare to 1621.
See also: beyond, comparison

compare notes

Exchange information, observations, or opinions about something, as in Michael and Jane always compare notes after a department meeting. This term originally referred to written notes. [c. 1700]
See also: compare, note
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

compare notes

exchange ideas, opinions, or information about a particular subject.
See also: compare, note
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

beyond/without comˈpare

(literary) too good, beautiful, etc. to be compared with anyone or anything else: The loveliness of the scene was beyond compare.
See also: beyond, compare, without

compare ˈnotes (with somebody)

exchange ideas or opinions with somebody, especially about shared experiences: We met after the exam to compare notes on how well we had done.
See also: compare, note
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

compare notes

To exchange ideas, views, or opinions.
See also: compare, note
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apples and oranges, like comparing

Comparing two unlike objects or issues. This term, dating from the second half of the 1900s, has largely replaced the difference between chalk and cheese, at least in America. The latter expression of disparateness is much older, dating from the 1500s. Why apples and oranges, since they’re both fruits, and not some other object is unclear. Nevertheless, it has caught on and is on the way to being a cliché.
See also: and, apple, compare, like

compare notes, to

To exchange opinions, impressions, or information. The original meaning referred to written notes, but the phrase soon included verbal exchanges as well. It was known by at least 1700. In 1712 Richard Steele wrote (in the Spectator), “They meet and compare notes upon your carriage.”
See also: compare
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
It would be especially interesting to compare Burke's style carefully with Gibbon's and Johnson's.
Compare or contrast his feeling for Nature and his treatment of Nature in his poetry with that of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, or Byron.
Compare with Carlyle in temperament, ideas, and usefulness.
Students might compare and contrast the poetry of these three men, either on the basis of points suggested in the text or otherwise.
Of all Athenians you have been the most constant resident in the city, which, as you never leave, you may be supposed to love (compare Phaedr.).
This compares to a 16.1% vacancy rate and 5,394,523 available square feet for the 1st quarter of 2004.
The randomized, open-label study compares the administration of zidovudine/ lamivudine (Combivir) with either nelfinavir (Viracept) or nevirapine (Viramune) twice daily in 142 HIV-infected, treatment naive patients.
This compares to the 16.5% vacancy rate and the availability of 5,608,813 square feet one year ago.