commute from (some place)

(redirected from commuting from)

commute from (some place)

To make a routine trip to one's place of work or school from another location (often where one lives). Until you relocate to Manhattan, you'll have to commute from Philadelphia for work.
See also: commute
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

commute from some place

to travel to work from some place. I commute from way out in the country. Betty commutes from only a few miles away and will be here very soon.
See also: commute, place
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Other sectors with a high share of workers commuting from outside the city include finance and insurance (38 percent) and government (30 percent).
"For about six weeks I had been commuting from Huddersfield to Manchester and back which was exhausting.
Part of the study concerned pilots commuting from where they live to the airport where they work, and this report is limited to those findings.
Computing patterns have become more diverse and complicated, with some people commuting from rural to suburban areas to work and some commuting between metro areas.
Instead of a centralized labor market where most jobs are concentrated in the inner city and residents of the suburbs are forced to commute to the city center, we now have a decentralized labor market, with firms located in the suburbs and "edge cities." (69) As a result, commuting patterns have also changed: the number of workers commuting to city jobs has dropped, while the number of workers commuting from the suburbs or from inner-city housing to jobs in the suburbs has risen.
Someone commuting from Fredericksburg to Union Station along I-95, for example, could save 36 minutes one way every day by carpooling.