community

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bedroom community

A community in which most people commute to jobs elsewhere (and thus usually only come home to sleep during the work week). Since I'm still in school, I'm not sure I want to live in a town that's such a bedroom community—I want to be able to spend time with people during the day when I'm not in class.
See also: bedroom, community

a pillar of society

or

a pillar of the community

If you describe someone as a pillar of society or a pillar of the community, you mean that they are an active and respected member of a group of people. He is a pillar of society, the son every mother would love to have. My father had been a pillar of the community.
See also: of, pillar, society

a pillar of society

a person regarded as a particularly responsible citizen.
The use of pillar to mean ‘a person regarded as a mainstay or support for something’ is recorded from medieval times; Pillars of Society was the English title of an 1888 play by the Norwegian dramatist Henrik Ibsen .
See also: of, pillar, society
References in periodicals archive ?
Once a prioritized list of technologies is established, the S & T community can gain consensus from the requirements and acquisition communities on the technology options being considered.
Providing a social justice outcome for smaller communities that could not support separate services (Bundy, 2002)
25) This territorial aspect of local communities was most important for boys, as they took part in the street battles that defined and reinforced territorial boundaries.
The three projects featured in this mini-monograph actively engage members of communities that experience disproportionate burdens of disease or ill health in the following manner.
With offices in Manhattan, Seedco (the Structured Employment Economic Development Corporation) is a national community development operating intermediary that creates opportunities for low-wage workers and their families through workforce development, small businesses assistance, and asset building promotion for residents and businesses in economically distressed communities.
As crime, particularly drug use and gang violence, seeps into smaller communities, some townships are implementing procedures to deter its spreading.
When schools, families, and communities foster protective factors, they are putting risk-reducing mechanisms in place that mediate risks in four ways: (a) Children are less impacted by the effects of risks with which they have come in direct contact; (b) the danger of exposure to the risk is reduced or the risk itself is modified; (c) children's self-efficacy and self-esteem are enhanced; and (d) children are provided with opportunities for meaningful involvement in their environments (Benard, 1991, 1995).
By linking her argument to this theoretical and contentious term, a more focused examination of post-modernism and how it is affecting (or not affecting) the oldtimers in the six post-agrarian communities would have strengthened the argument about the emergence of the postagrarian community.
Team members carried out the following activities: 1) advised other SARS emergency response teams on how to minimize the risk of stigmatizing groups in their own communications by focusing messages on the virus and the relevant behavioral risk factors; 2) assisted with developing culturally tailored health education materials; and 3) conducted community visits, panel discussions, and media interviews to positively influence negative behaviors occurring in communities.
CIS expertise was also introduced to the communities.
A model and training manual are being developed in order to help other communities implement a similar type of initiative.
Prominent consultant Joseph Brann, director of the Community Oriented Policing Services, or COPS, grants during the Clinton administration, tells us: ``An essential currency of the war on terrorism is information provided by communities.
There are as many different kinds of community gardens as there are communities.
There is no single answer to this question, of course, because of the friction between the sense of "belonging equally to" embedded in the Latin communities and the multiplicity of actual communities in which any one person or family lived.
By any name, the changes hold promise--for the forests and for the communities surrounded by national forests.
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