communicate with (one)

(redirected from communicate with them)

communicate with (one)

1. To talk to one. Well, if you didn't communicate with him, how was he supposed to know what you needed?
2. To convey a message to and be understood by another person. Even though they've been married for years, they still sometimes have a hard time communicating with each other.
See also: communicate

communicate with someone

 
1. Lit. to correspond or talk with a person. I have to communicate with Wally first. As soon as I have communicated with Fred, I can give you an answer.
2. Fig. to make oneself understood with a person. (Often used with a negative.) I just don't seem to communicate with Sam, no matter what I do. We just can't seem to communicate with each other.
See also: communicate
References in periodicals archive ?
"We strive to put farm managers at the front of the communications and to communicate with them at the same time as our sales force," says Reeves.
You should get to know the movers, shakers, and players and how to communicate with them.
"The principal complaint which patients make about 'modern science medicine' is the failure of physicians to communicate with them adequately," wrote Osler.
They cannot communicate with us, and we cannot communicate with them.
However, in 1997 only about 1 to 2 percent of physicians offered patients this option to communicate with them. (13) A survey of 10,000 physicians released in May 1999 by Healtheon found that 33 percent had used email at some point to communicate with patients, a 200 percent jump over the year before.
For those with Alzheimer's who have behavior problems, being able to communicate with them in their own language helps staff to resolve their problems more easily.
While on patrol, he met several deaf people and couldn't communicate with them, which just didn't make him feel right.
The results suggest that the way physician executives communicate in upward influence situations is affected by the way their superiors communicate with them.
The purpose of this study is to examine physician executives' communicator style preferences when attempting to influence subordinates who communicate with them in attractive (i.e., attentive, friendly, and relaxed) and unattractive (i.e., not attentive, not friendly, and not relaxed) styles.
The present investigation extends the research of an earlier study examining physician executives' choices of persuasion strategies to gain compliance from superiors who communicate with them in attractive and unattractive styles.