come to the fore

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come to the fore

To be emphasized or made more noticeable. This argument needs to come to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Questions of corruption came to the fore after the auditors found discrepancies in the yearly budget report.
See also: come, fore
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come to the fore

Fig. to become prominent; to become important. The question of salary has now come to the fore. Since his great successes as a prosecutor, he has really come to the fore in city politics.
See also: come, fore
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

be/come to the ˈfore

(British English) (American English be at the ˈfore) be or become important and noticed by people; play an important part: She came very much to the fore in the area during the local campaign against the new bypass.
Fore means ‘front’.
See also: come, fore
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- Special Assistant to PM on Information and Broadcasting Dr Firdous Ashiq Awan has said that positive results of Prime Minister Imran Khan's visit to the US has started coming to the fore.
The special assistant, in a series of tweets, the said positive results of Prime Minister Imran Khan's visit to the United States had started coming to the fore.
Speaking at the first National Workshop on Explosives Detection (NWED), which was inaugurated on Friday at the High Energy Materials Research Laboratory (HEMRL) in Pune, Kulkarni noted that a number of branches of militancy are coming to the fore, and dubbed these as a major cause of worry for the national security of the country.
He said that the new generation is coming to the fore and this will also bring the change (tabdeeli) to the fore.
Nawaz said that several examples of polls-rigging were coming to the fore, adding that achieving favourable results would not improve the situation.
The 7-4 favourite responded to every question put to him by Moore, though, and with his stamina coming to the fore in the testing conditions, he held on by a head as Cannonball lunged late.
Root led the tourists to a bruising 4-0 defeat in the Test series but he has personified a glaring shift in fortunes, coming to the fore in handsome one-day victories at MCG and the Gabba.
The man is sheer class and with a bit of rugby under his belt that class is really coming to the fore.
The Belgian reached the last eight in Rome last year, falling to tournament winner Andy Murray, but Cilic is coming to the fore at the right time and on his day he is one of the classiest operators on tour.
In the third edition of their textbook, Claswon and Oxley highlight issues that were coming to the fore at the beginning of the campaign for the 2016 US presidential election, as well as expanded coverage of partisanship, polarization, the Millennial generation, social media, same-sex marriage, and civil liberties.
Bad weather conditions had forced the postponement of the race by a day, and it was Tabar 12 coming to the fore in their close fight with fellow stable-mate Tabar 1.
Terms like 'counterparty risk' and 'potentially new European bank equity capital needs to offset write-offs' are coming to the fore when chatting with investors.'
For the signature bake, the contestants must prepare quick breads with no proving - which results in creative flavours such as sweet chocolate loaves coming to the fore.
He has no longer been a guaranteed starter with Ciaran Clark, Jores Okore and, to a lesser extent, Nathan Baker coming to the fore.