come to terms

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come to terms

1. To agree to or do something, especially a set of demands or conditions. The government came to terms after the rebels' unflinching siege of the king's palace.
2. To begin to or make an effort to understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or problematic person, thing, or situation. I should have the report ready for you by this afternoon, I just need to come to terms with this new software update first. I've tried, but I just can't come to terms with Amy, she's totally out of control!
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come to terms

 (with someone or something)
1. to come to an agreement with someone. I finally came to terms with my lawyer about his fee. Bob, you have to come to terms with your father.
2. to learn to accept someone or something. She had to come to terms with the loss of her sight. She couldn't come to terms with her estranged husband.
See also: come, term

come to terms

(about someone or something) and come to terms (on someone or something) [for two or more people] to reach an accord on someone or something. Ed and Alice came to terms about money. They did not come to terms on the price.
See also: come, term

come to terms

1. Reach an agreement, as in The landlord and his tenants soon came to terms regarding repairs. [Early 1700s]
2. come to terms with. Reconcile oneself to, as in He'd been trying to come to terms with his early life. [Mid-1800s]
See also: come, term
References in periodicals archive ?
In the following chapters Coming to Terms considers legal arguments and propositions aimed at identifying the scope, enforceability and consequential effect of these documents.
A scholarly compendium of well-reasoned, accessible articles, Coming to Terms with Nature examines contemporary environmental concerns in a socio-political context.
The couple were coming to terms with a burglary on March 10 when they were again raided, this time while in the property.
Your answer will depend on how much risk you can stomach coming to terms with such unexpected art.
It's about coming to terms with your own pitfalls and establishing conscious strategies to sidestep them.
For sellers, the biggest hurdle to a successful transaction is coming to terms with the true market value of their home.
The poet's struggle is, as most everyone agrees, one of coming to terms with harmony.
Worse, young people coming to terms with their sexual identity and the cruel taunts of classmates did not need the church perpetuating gays' self-loathing or giving bashers a religious rationale for violence.
But such brutal honesty has the potential of being counterproductive and self-defeating for a person who is newly diagnosed and slowly coming to terms with the diagnosis.
Parker's personal story involves coming to terms with an abortion she decided to have without adequate reflection, resulting in the loss of what was to be, as she puts it, her only child.
The proclamation, both simple and profound, of God's presence in the midst of the world's wreckage, is the beginning of what will be - for us, for our nations, and for our world - a long process of coming to terms with this new manifestation of evil.
More importantly, we watch the father coming to terms with his own life and death.
Rather, small victories, such as escaping punishment after accidentally setting an abandoned house on fire, and intensely personal defeats, such as coming to terms with the death of his grandmother, influenced young Watkins's emotional life.
The film, which was carefully researched, was to observe a man coming to terms with his loss of memory.
Titanic and The Sweet Hereafter, although vastly different in budget and market, they share something special apart from both directors being Canadian--death and coming to terms with grief in a very public manner.