come to terms

(redirected from coming to terms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

come to terms

1. To agree to or do something, especially a set of demands or conditions. The government came to terms after the rebels' unflinching siege of the king's palace.
2. To begin to or make an effort to understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or problematic person, thing, or situation. I should have the report ready for you by this afternoon, I just need to come to terms with this new software update first. I've tried, but I just can't come to terms with Amy, she's totally out of control!
See also: come, term
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come to terms

 (with someone or something)
1. to come to an agreement with someone. I finally came to terms with my lawyer about his fee. Bob, you have to come to terms with your father.
2. to learn to accept someone or something. She had to come to terms with the loss of her sight. She couldn't come to terms with her estranged husband.
See also: come, term

come to terms

(about someone or something) and come to terms (on someone or something) [for two or more people] to reach an accord on someone or something. Ed and Alice came to terms about money. They did not come to terms on the price.
See also: come, term
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come to terms

1. Reach an agreement, as in The landlord and his tenants soon came to terms regarding repairs. [Early 1700s]
2. come to terms with. Reconcile oneself to, as in He'd been trying to come to terms with his early life. [Mid-1800s]
See also: come, term
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
In the following chapters Coming to Terms considers legal arguments and propositions aimed at identifying the scope, enforceability and consequential effect of these documents.
But Hann was well aware his efforts will go largely unnoticed by a nation still coming to terms with defeat at the hands of England in Saturday's rugby union World Cup final.
According to session chair Bjorn Olsson, a lecturer in computer sciences at the University of Sk6vde, Sweden, the presentations showed that the field of bioinformatics is coming to terms with the capabilities it has to offer.
* For sellers, the biggest hurdle to a successful transaction is coming to terms with the true market value of their home.
The poet's struggle is, as most everyone agrees, one of coming to terms with harmony.
Saints are still coming to terms with Friday night's calamitous 38-0 thrashing in the World Club Challenge and they have just six days to pick themselves up for the start of Super League VIII.
Worse, young people coming to terms with their sexual identity and the cruel taunts of classmates did not need the church perpetuating gays' self-loathing or giving bashers a religious rationale for violence.
But such brutal honesty has the potential of being counterproductive and self-defeating for a person who is newly diagnosed and slowly coming to terms with the diagnosis.
Parker's personal story involves coming to terms with an abortion she decided to have without adequate reflection, resulting in the loss of what was to be, as she puts it, her only child.
For years as a priest, pastor and bishop, Bishop Spong has struggled with the issues of ordinary life and the seeming intransigence of institutional Christianity in coming to terms with them.
Among them was former actor Robin Aubert's Lila, a gripping, well-written and beautifully acted love story set in the rough world of street punks; Quebec City-based Jeremy Peter Allen's Requiem contre un plafond, a very funny comedy about suicide and bad cellists starring Yves Jacques at his manic best; Jean-Francois Monette's sensible exploration of a young man's coming to terms with his emerging homosexuality in Take-Out; former rock musician Michel Gatignol's brilliantly whimsical La Venus de Milo ne peutpas se faire plaisir, a very funny explanation as to why the Venus de Milo statue lost its arms; and animator's Claude Cloutier's extraordinary Do Big Bang a mardi mat-in, an engaging and imaginative account of man's evolution, from protozoa to stuck-in-traffic businessman.
VENETIA WILLIAMS, still coming to terms with the ban on The Outback Way travelling to Japan for the Grand Jump, gained some compensation when Bicycle Thief won the featured Lingfield Gold Cup Hurdle.
"It was not that the old elite was displaced, it was that in the process of coming to terms with new realities, the black elite redefined itself on a more permanent foundation." (8) Ultimately she finds that while the old elite had sought to distance themselves from the masses, they and the new professionals, pushed by growing racism and Jim Crow as well as pulled by internal pressures, drew "closer to the masses" and thus became "true race leaders." (2) Their emerging ideology and programs of racial uplift provided a means for this to take place.
Clearly his father, also a writer, is a hero, not just to his son, and we don't need convincing that the 68-year-old man will die with dignity "--not pride, but its opposite, the dignity of someone untroubled by pride." More importantly, we watch the father coming to terms with his own life and death.
"Despite the imprint of the migration indelibly etched on the community of Harlem and the lives of the many writers of its literary culture, the fiction of the 1920's contains surprisingly little emphasis on coming to terms with the impact of the Great Migration." Many of the star writers of the Renaissance were migrants themselves, but Rodgers argues that most hailed from the black middle class.