come to

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come to

1. To regain consciousness. After Lily fainted, we used smelling salts to get her to come to. The patient wasn't sure where he was when he came to in the emergency room.
2. To be called to one's mind. Give me a minute, that song will come to me. Why do the best ideas always come to me in the shower when I can't write them down?
3. To reach a conclusion of some kind, such as a decision. How did you come to this decision? Tell me your thought process.
4. To arrive at or visit a particular place. I came to this city because it's home to such beautiful architecture. I'll come to your house tonight and drop off your cake pan.
5. To reach a particular sum, as of a bill. Your total comes to $47.80.
6. To have a particular impact, result, or consequence. I hope my lies don't come to any consequence. That meeting nearly came to blows after the fiery testimony.
7. To be revealed or exposed. This meaning is often conveyed through the phrase "come to light." Discrepancies in the yearly budget report only came to light after the auditors began analyzing it. These incriminating documents came to light because of a whistleblower's tireless efforts.
8. To resume acting or feeling as one normally does. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used after "to." I was starting to get disoriented after being awake for 36 hours straight, but I came to myself after a good night's rest.
9. To anchor a ship. We'll come to in this port for now and regroup.
10. To position a ship with its bow in the wind. The ship needs to come to so that we can visit the port.
See also: come

come to something

to end up being helpful or significant. (See also amount to something; when it comes to something.) Do you think this work will come to anything? I don't think this will come to what we were promised.
See also: come

come to

to become conscious; to wake up. We threw a little cold water in his face, and he came to immediately.
See also: come

come to oneself

to begin acting and thinking like one's normal self. I began to come to myself and realize the wrong I had done. Please come to yourself and stop acting so strangely.
See also: come

come to

1. Recover consciousness, as in She fainted but quickly came to. [Second half of 1500s]
2. Arrive at, learn, as in I came to see that Tom had been right all along. [c. 1700]
3. See amount to, def. 2.
5. Stop a sailboat or other vessel by bringing the bow into the wind or dropping anchor, as in "The gale having gone over, we came to" (Richard Dana, Two Years Before the Mast, 1840). [Early 1700s] Also see the subsequent entries beginning with come to.
See also: come

come to

v.
1. To arrive at a place: We came to this city looking for a new life.
2. To come to the mind of someone; occur to someone: An interesting idea just came to me.
3. To have some sum as a total: The bill for dinner came to $40.
4. To arrive at some final state; amount to something: What will these strange events come to? So far, my miserable life has come to nothing.
5. To recover consciousness: The fainting victim came to.
6. Nautical To bring the bow into the wind: We should stop right here, so come to and we'll let the sails luff.
7. Nautical To anchor: We came to in the cove and spent the night there.
See also: come

come to

light/hand
To be clearly revealed or disclosed: "A further problem ... came to light last summer as a result of post-flight inspections" (John Noble Wilford).
See also: come
References in classic literature ?
Do you mean that John Douglas has been coming to see you for twenty years?
Her astonishment at his coming -- at his coming to Netherfield, to Longbourn, and voluntarily seeking her again, was almost equal to what she had known on first witnessing his altered behaviour in Derbyshire.
You shall know presently, sir," answered Partridge, "I am coming to it as fast as I can.
Indeed, we mentioned a great deal about young Madam Western, and George told me all; that Mr Blifil is coming to town in order to be married to her.
According to this diversion plan, those coming to Islamabad from Expressway would have to go at Taramri Chowk from Khana Pul and to reach Rawal Dam and Dhokri Chowk from there.
In the first reading, Deutero-Isaiah comforts his exiled contemporaries with the good news that God is coming to their rescue.
Society is still far too cruel to homosexuals, and those who are coming to terms with their own sexuality have the toughest road.
I like seeing something on the bigger screen and coming to the movies with my friends and my family.
Coming out is a personal process, and maybe she's still coming to grips with being a lesbian.
We are not coming to Jesus here as much as we are going with Jesus.
A believer, coming to the gospels in private prayer or in the liturgy of the church, doesn't have to have all this academic finesse.
Coming to Birth by Marjorie Oludhe Macgoye The Feminist Press at the City University of New York, December 2000, $30.
The image coming to me was not the crucifixion but the resurrected, cosmic Christ, taking the wounds of the outstretched crucified hands with him into eternity yet coming to me, inviting embrace -- coming, yet waiting; appealing to me, yet respectful of my own integrity.
While the Downtown Business Improvement District - the Alliance for Downtown Manhattan - and the mayor's plan to reduce taxes are finally coming to fruition, Hauspurg believes they are six or seven years overdue.
I look at it and feel tears coming to my eyes too, but I don't know why.