come into play

(redirected from coming into play)

come into play

To become a factor in a particular situation. Once personal insults come into play, it's very hard to resolve a situation calmly. My kids usually get cranky as bedtime approaches and tiredness comes into play.
See also: come, play

come into play

to become an important factor in something; to go into force. All your hard practice and preparation will now come into play in the finals.
See also: come, play

come into ˈplay

begin to operate or be active; have an effect or influence: It’s time for the first part of our plan to come into play.A lot of different factors came into play in making this decision.
See also: come, play
References in periodicals archive ?
With the Marriot Hotel development site coming into play, there are proposed zoning changes for 125th Street currently being looked into by the city.
But the guessing starts coming into play when determining China's future role.
The 182-yard par-3 13th is just as difficult, with the same OB concerns coming into play on the left.
One involves the business combinations issue -- due to the totally new standards coming into play.
There are so many new technologies coming into play, now, it's very difficult to project where we will be.
The way the deal is shaping up and the issues that are coming into play make the whole greater than the sum of its parts.
For many years, this retail area was in the doldrums, but with new businesses, Fox Cable and Credit Suisse First Boston, for example, taking office space here and new and reopened hotels coming into play, there is a crying need for retail geared to the needs of the new shopping audience.
With the whole SAN infrastructure coming into play, tape drives become another appliance hanging off a SAN.
Water also is a factor at Olivas, with lakes coming into play on six holes.
The 4GB SSD can work in tandem with a hybrid hard drive, coming into play as a secondary source of cached data.
Once I saw her swing coming into play, I knew she would do well.
As retiring Baby Boomers move from the accumulation phase into the income distribution phase, many trillions of dollars of retirement assets are coming into play.
Today, more than ever, non-cash perks, such as development opportunities, advancement, and work/life balance initiatives are coming into play.
Interconnect business requirements are constantly changing, with new market forces and regulatory requirements consistently coming into play.