comfort

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Related to comforts: creature comforts

comfort girl

slang A woman or girl forced into sexual slavery or recruited into prostitution by and in service of the Japanese Imperial Army before and during World War II. Although the Japanese government officially admitted to its role in coercing women to become comfort girls during the Second World War, there are still many who deny how many women were affected and the extent to which the government was responsible at the time.
See also: comfort, girl

comfort woman

slang A woman or girl forced into sexual slavery or recruited into prostitution by and in service of the Japanese Imperial Army before and during World War II. Although the Japanese government officially admitted to its role in coercing women to become comfort women during the Second World War, there are still many who deny how many were affected and the extent to which the government was responsible at the time.
See also: comfort, woman

comfort zone

1. A place, activity, situation, or psychological state in which a person feels free from anxiety and is within their of ability, experience, security, and/or control. Though it is often outside your comfort zone, traveling to foreign countries gives you a much greater perspective on how other people in the world live. The new job is a little out of my comfort zone, but it will give me a great opportunity to see what I'm truly capable of.
2. The temperature range wherein the human body feels naturally comfortable, being neither too hot nor too cold. Many retired Americans, being more sensitive to the cold, settle in Florida, where the balmy weather better suits their comfort zones.
See also: comfort, zone

take comfort in (something)

To be soothed or calmed by something. I know this trial has been tremendously hard on you, but take comfort in the fact that the man responsible is now behind bars forever. When things get tough, I take comfort in the company of my closest friends.
See also: comfort, take

be cold comfort

To fail as an intended source of solace. The news that I got a meager raise is cold comfort after not getting that big promotion. The fact that it's "stage one" is cold comfort to me—it's still cancer!
See also: cold, comfort

too close for comfort

1. So close as to cause worry because of being dangerous or unwelcome in some way. The way these planes fly so low over the house is just too close for comfort. My neighbors and I all feel that the new shopping center they're planning near our neighborhood is a little too close for comfort.
2. Too narrow a margin for error or deviation. Having only $20 in your bank account is far too close for comfort, if you ask me.
See also: close, comfort

cold comfort

Something that has failed as an intended source of solace. The news that I got a meager raise is cold comfort after not getting that big promotion. The fact that it's "stage one" is cold comfort to me—it's still cancer!
See also: cold, comfort

creature comforts

Things that one needs in order to feel happy and comfortable. I have a hard time abandoning my creature comforts to go hiking and camping. At a minimum, I need running water!
See also: comfort, creature

there, there

A phrase used to soothe one who is upset. There, there, sweetie. Everything is going to be OK.
See also: there

too (something) for comfort

Having more of some quality or trait than one would like or is comfortable with. Used especially in the phrase "too close for comfort." The way these planes fly so low over the house is just too close for comfort. Though the company seems to be doing well, some analysts are actually worried that its stocks are climbing too fast for comfort and could indicate a sudden sharp decrease.
See also: comfort

comfort station

A public bathroom. I sure hope there's a comfort station at this next rest stop!
See also: comfort, station

cold comfort

no comfort or consolation at all. She knows there are others worse off than her, but that's cold comfort. It was cold comfort to the student that others had failed as he had done.
See also: cold, comfort

creature comforts

things that make people comfortable. The hotel room was a bit small, but all the creature comforts were there.
See also: comfort, creature

There, there.

 and There, now.
an expression used to comfort someone. There, there. You'll feel better after you take a nap. There, now. Everything will be all right.
See also: there

too close for comfort

Cliché [for a misfortune or a threat] to be dangerously close. That car nearly hit me! That was too close for comfort. When I was in the hospital, I nearly died from pneumonia. Believe me, that was too close for comfort.
See also: close, comfort

cold comfort

Slight or no consolation. For example, He can't lend us his canoe but will tell us where to rent one-that's cold comfort. The adjective cold was being applied to comfort in this sense by the early 1300s, and Shakespeare used the idiom numerous times.
See also: cold, comfort

creature comfort

Something that contributes to physical comfort, such as food, clothing, or housing. For example, Dean always stayed in the best hotels; he valued his creature comforts. This idiom was first recorded in 1659.
See also: comfort, creature

too close for comfort

Also, too close to home. Dangerously nearby or accurate, as in That last shot was too close for comfort, or Their attacks on the speaker hit too close to home, and he left in a huff.
See also: close, comfort

cold comfort

COMMON If a fact or statement is cold comfort to someone in a difficult situation, it does not make them feel less worried or sad. `Three years in higher education is a good investment for the future,' he says. But that is cold comfort to graduates who have worked so hard to get a degree, and now find themselves unemployed.
See also: cold, comfort

too close/high, etc. for comfort

COMMON If something is too close/high, etc. for comfort, it is closer/higher, etc. than you would like it to be or than is safe. The bombs fell in the sea, many too close for comfort. Levels of crime were still too high for comfort.
See also: close, comfort

creature comforts

Creature comforts are all the modern sleeping, eating, and washing facilities that make life easy and pleasant. Each room has its own patio or balcony and provides guests with all modern creature comforts. I'm not a camper — I like my creature comforts too much. Note: An old meaning of `creatures' is material comforts, or things that make you feel comfortable.
See also: comfort, creature

too close for comfort

dangerously or uncomfortably near.
See also: close, comfort

cold comfort

poor or inadequate consolation.
This expression, together with the previous idiom, reflects a traditional view that charity is often given in a perfunctory or uncaring way. The words cold (as the opposite of ‘encouraging’) and comfort have been associated since the early 14th century, but perhaps the phrase is most memorably linked for modern readers with the title of Stella Gibbons 's 1933 parody of sentimental novels of rural life, Cold Comfort Farm.
See also: cold, comfort

too — for comfort

causing physical or mental unease by an excess of the specified quality.
1994 Janice Galloway Foreign Parts They were all too at peace with themselves, too untroubled for comfort.
See also: comfort

too close for ˈcomfort

so near that you become afraid or anxious: The exams are getting a bit too close for comfort.
See also: close, comfort

ˌcold ˈcomfort

a thing that is intended to make you feel better but which does not: When you’ve just had your car stolen, it’s cold comfort to be told it happens to somebody every day.
See also: cold, comfort

comfort station

1. n. a restroom; toilet facilities available to the public. (Euphemistic.) We need to stop and find a comfort station in the next town.
2. n. an establishment that sells liquor. Let’s get some belch at a comfort station along here somewhere.
See also: comfort, station

close call/shave, a

A narrow escape, a near miss. Both phrases are originally American. The first dates from the 1880s and is thought to come from sports, where a close call was a decision by an umpire or referee that could have gone either way. A close shave is from the early nineteenth century and reflects the narrow margin between smoothly shaved skin and a nasty cut from the razor. Both were transferred to mean any narrow escape from danger. Incidentally, a close shave was in much earlier days equated with miserliness. Erasmus’s 1523 collection of adages has it, “He shaves right to the quick,” meaning he makes the barber give him a very close shave so that he will not need another for some time. Two synonymous modern clichés are too close for comfort and too close to home.
See also: call, close

cold comfort

That’s little or no consolation. “Colde watz his cumfort,” reads a poem of unknown authorship written about 1325. The alliterative phrase appealed to Shakespeare, who used it a number of times (in King John, The Tempest, The Taming of the Shrew). It acquired cliché status by about 1800. Stella Gibbons used it in the title of her humorous book Cold Comfort Farm (1932).
See also: cold, comfort

creature comforts

Life’s material amenities. The term dates from the seventeenth century; it appears in Thomas Brooks’s Collected Works (1670), and again in Matthew Henry’s 1710 Commentaries on the Psalms (“They have . . . the sweetest relish of their creature comforts”).
See also: comfort, creature

cold comfort

Offering limited sympathy or encouragement. People who lost their jobs during the recession would likely take cold comfort from economic reports that an upturn was likely to occur in the future. Shakespeare used the phrase in King John: “I do not ask you much, I beg cold comfort; and you are so strait / And so ingrateful, you deny me that.”
See also: cold, comfort
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing from ethnographic research in Canadian off-grid homes, this paper examines the notion of visual comfort. Like other types of comfort, visual comfort is an affective sensibility whose intensity and achievement are highly variable.
Keywords: comfort, energy, light, off-grid, visual ethnography, consumption
Lord God, giver of all solace and provider of comfort in our hour of fear, anger and sorrow, bring your comforting spirit to all those who are missing and help those who suffer the pain of separation to feel the love you have for us all.
Comfort and convenience merge with guaranteed savings at Doubletree hotels.
For comfort and convenience, as well as added value for guests and corporate travel planners alike, it all comes together at Doubletree hotels.
Although written protocols currently are directed more to pain relief than to the comfort of each child, there is rising interest expressed in pediatric literature about comforting strategies when assisting with or performing invasive procedures.
Proactive assessment and care seeks not only to minimize negative aspects of illness and trauma (such as pain, depression, anxiety), but to enhance positive indicators of daily function (such as comfort, hope, resiliency) (Magvary, 2002).
As Langford and Morgan have shown, the English home's requirements of a fire and a wife are comforts English men found it difficult to live without (115; 182-83).
Norris incessantly pursues creature comforts. The four "pheasant's eggs, and a cream cheese" she acquires from the Rushworths' housekeeper during a family outing to Sotherton hold more importance for her than her nieces' physical comfort during the carriage ride home (MP 104).
The repetition of the verb rendered "comfort" encompasses its use in the present, in the future, and in an ongoing mode.
The anomaly is that the performers are never truly alone, unless inside themselves, and indeed appear too agitated for anything that might be considered comfort. Whether alone, in pairs, or groups of varying dimension, they move erratically and rapidly across stage.
Miami, FL, November 29, 2012 --(PR.com)-- An innovative new product designed to bring unprecedented functionality to a commonly used outdoor product, the Comfort Air Tent, has been developed by Jason Fahl of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Brad Horsch of The Comfort Specialists said, "Our goal is to educate the community on how to get the best results for all their property improvement projects at any budget.
His words "though your Lordships have now here on earth been judges to my condemnation, we may yet hereafter in heaven merrily all meet, to our everlasting salvation" are repeated in his hope-filled words of loving comfort to his daughter, written in charcoal (his books and writing materials had been confiscated) on the eve of his martyrdom: "Farewell, my dear child, and pray for me, and I shall for you and all your friends that we may merrily meet in heaven."
Newark, CA, March 03, 2011 --(PR.com)-- Patient Comfort Systems, Inc.