come on

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come on

1. expression Stop it. Oh, come on, you're as smart as anyone in this program. Come on, leave me alone!
2. expression Please agree to this request. Come on, Mom, all of my friends will be there. Can't I go too?
3. verb To hurry up or move faster. To convey this meaning, the phrase is often used in the imperative. Come on, we're going to be late!
4. verb To flirt with or otherwise show romantic or sexual interest in someone. I can't believe he came on to you—he's a married man!
5. verb To appear on stage. And then you two come on after Greg finishes that line. When does the band come on?
6. verb To find someone or something accidentally or without looking. "Come upon" can also be used to convey this meaning. Please don't be upset, we didn't mean to exclude you! When Chad and I went out, we just came on the rest of the group, that's all! Were you snooping in my room? How else would you just come upon my love letter?
7. verb To be seen in a particular way by other people. Molly comes on cheerful and bubbly, and that's truly her personality—you'll find that out once you get to know her better.
8. verb To develop or advance. Once the storm comes on, be ready to contend with much stronger winds. Nightfall comes on so much earlier in the winter.
9. verb To start a work shift. I gave that patient to Sally when she came on last night.
10. verb To be experienced, as of an onset of pain or discomfort. The stomach pain came on suddenly last night and was so severe that it woke me up.
11. verb To turn on or begin working. When the house lights came on, we knew the band wasn't going to play another encore. Why isn't this computer coming on? Am I doing something wrong?
12. verb To be broadcast, as on a TV. When does that show come on? Grab the popcorn, the movie's coming on now!
13. noun A flirtatious statement or gesture. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. I told him that I have a boyfriend, but he just won't stop with the come-ons.
14. noun Something done or offered to appeal to potential customers. In this usage, the phrase is typically hyphenated. Even though we lowered prices as a come-on to customers, we're still far from meeting our sales goal.
See also: come, on

come (up)on someone or something

to find or happen on someone or something. (See also happen (up)on someone or something.) I came upon Walter while I was in the bookstore. I came on this little store near Maple Street that has everything we need.
See also: come, on

come on (duty)

to begin to work at one's scheduled time. When did you come on duty tonight? What time does she come on?
See also: come, on

come on (to someone)

Sl. to attempt to interest someone romantically or sexually. He was trying to come on to me, but I found him unappealing.
See also: come, on

come on

 
1. Stop it!; Stop doing that. (Usually come On!) Mary: Are you really going to sell your new car? Sally: Come on! How dumb do you think I am?
2. please oblige me. Mother: Sorry. You can't go! Bill: Come on, let me go to the picnic! "Come on," whined Jimmy, "I want some more!"
3. to hurry up; to follow someone. If you don't come on, we'll miss the train.
4. [for electricity or some other device] to start operating. After a while, the lights came on again. I hope the heat comes on soon.
5. to walk out and appear on stage. You are to come on when you hear your cue.
6. Fig. [for a pain] to begin hurting; [for a disease] to attack someone. The pain began to come on again, and Sally had to lie down.
7. [for a program] to be broadcast on radio or television. The news didn't come on until an hour later.
See also: come, on

come on

somehow to advance in some fashion, manner, rate, or degree. Darkness comes on early these days. The illness comes on by degrees.
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come on(to) someone or something

to find someone or something by accident; to happen onto someone or something. When I was out on my walk, I came on a little shop that sells leather goods. I came onto an old friend of yours downtown today.
See also: come, on

come on

1. Move forward, progress, develop. For example, We stopped as soon as darkness began to come on. [Early 1600s]
2. Hurry up, as in Come on now, it's getting late. This imperative to urge someone forward has been so used since about 1450.
3. Also, come upon. Meet or find unexpectedly, as in We came on him while walking down the street, or I came upon an old friend in the bookstore today. [Second half of 1700s]
4. Make a stage entrance, as in After the next cue she comes on from the right. [Early 1800s]
5. Please oblige me, as in Come on, that's no excuse for leaving, or Come on, you'll really like this restaurant. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
6. Convey a specific personal image, as in He comes on like a go-getter but he's really rather timid. [Slang; c. 1940]
7. Also, come on strong. Behave or speak in an aggressive way, as in Take it easy; you're coming on awfully strong. [c. 1940]
8. Also, come on to. Make sexual advances, as in She reported her boss for coming on to her. This usage probably was derived from the earlier use of the noun come-on for a sexual advance. [Slang; 1950s]
See also: come, on

come on

v.
1. To begin by degrees: Darkness came on quickly that evening. I have a terrible sore throat; I feel the flu coming on.
2. To begin to be broadcast or communicated, as of television or radio programs: My son's favorite show doesn't come on until 7:30.
3. To connect to a channel of communication: We had been talking for an hour when my cousin came on the phone and asked us to stop.
4. To activate or be activated: The room was dark when the lights suddenly came on.
5. To hurry up; move rapidly. Used chiefly as a command: Would you please come on? We'll be late!
6. To stop an inappropriate behavior; abandon a position or an attitude; be obliging. Used chiefly as a command: Come on; you've been using the same feeble excuse for weeks.
7. To convey a particular personal image: The fellow comes on as an old-fashioned reactionary, but he's actually quite open-minded.
8. Slang come on to To show sexual interest in someone: Two people tried to come on to me at the party.
See also: come, on

come upon

v.
To discover or meet someone or something by accident: While walking down the road, I came upon a strange old house.
See also: come, upon

come on

1. n. a lure; bait. (Usually come-on.) It’s just a come on. Nobody is giving away a decent color TV just for listening to a sales pitch.
2. n. an invitation; a sexual invitation. (Usually come-on.) She stared at him with her bedroom eyes, giving him that age-old come-on.
3. in. to begin to perform well. In the second scene, the entire cast came on, and the audience loved it.
4. in. to feel the effects of a drug; for a drug to take effect. (Drugs.) After what seemed a long time, I began to come on to the stuff.
5. exclam. You are wrong! (Usually Come on!) Come on! Wasteful spending occurs at all levels of all governments! Nobody is innocent!
See also: come, on
References in periodicals archive ?
In her book Running Out of Time (1995), a young girl comes upon a man to whom she later refers as "the fat environmentalist." The man says to her: "It's not like I care that much about losing weight.
Louis's nephew, Francois Couperin, observes in his L'art de toucher le clavecin how unmeasured preludes are the musical equivalent of prose: |a free composition where the imagination is receptive to everything that comes upon it'.
And it's true: essentially it's an empty room, but how one comes upon it, how it happens, is totally different for each of us.
In Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale, the reader comes upon this remarkable one-liner: "Nothing changes instantaneously: In a gradually heating bathtub, you'd be burned to death before you knew it." I think we're jammed inside that bathtub and the water's getting hot.
The agreement comes upon the directives of the political leaderships of the two countries to enhance joint investments and create more jobs.
Such project comes upon the instructions of His Highness the Amir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah to turn Kuwait into a financial and commercial center.
NNA - Lebanese Army Commander, General Jean Qahwaji delivered on Monday the Order of the Day on the occasion of Lebanon's 73rd Independence Day: "Fellow Soldiers, The Independence Day comes upon us this year and brings along the hope that we have been missing during the years of the presidential vacuum, to declare the coming of a promising era in light of the newly organized state institutions and the their new coherence.
He added that the meeting comes upon the decision of the first meeting of the GCC ministers responsible for tourism in support of the proposal of Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, President of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, which was welcomed by the responsible agencies for culture in the member states.
Speaking at a press conference to speak about the preliminary schedule of the Pope's visit, Momani said: "We are looking forward with all love, respect and appreciation for the visit, which comes upon an invitation by His Majesty King Abdullah II."
RAFO Band participation comes upon the invitation of the Organizing Committee of the Festival to RAFO Command and to strengthen the relations and cooperation ties between the two countries laid by His Majesty Sultan Qaboos Bin Said, the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces.
On this day, Skeet comes upon a manatee sunning itself along the shoreline.
Then walks swiftly back to the foredeck, steps over the rail, and hangs on in a crouch, looking down between his legs at the rope emerging from the mooring pipe and the black water underneath and in one motion pushes off and grabs the rope to his chest as he falls and wraps his legs around it, finding a center of balance after a few scary lurches." He loves the feeling of freedom away from the ship at first but later comes upon some warehouses where he is able to steal food to bring back to the ship, frozen shrimp, blueberries, a side of beef.
News of the lease with The Related Companies comes upon the heels of an announcement in late June that Millennium Partners would erect a 37-story "green" residential building at Battery Park City.
Here, she comes upon the very animals whose skins and fur were used to make coats like she had seen.
By the time she comes upon the scene of a real sexual crime Briony has already chosen her villain, and will not be dissuaded by a lack of evidence or the protests of the victims of her libel.