come up in the world

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come up

1. To physically travel from a lower point or level to a higher one. When you get here, just come up to my apartment—it's on the fourth floor. Come up here and look at this leak in the bathroom.
2. To rise in the sky, as of the sun. These days, I'm always awake before the sun comes up, thanks to my infant daughter.
3. To become a topic of discussion. Unfortunately, the idea of a raise never came up in our meeting.
4. To happen or occur unexpectedly. Setbacks keep coming up in our investigation.
5. To come near or approach. He came up to me in the club and asked if I would like to dance.
6. To compare with or equal something in value, size, standards, etc. The new courthouse doesn't come up to the grand elegance of the old building, but it will be much more functionally efficient. My electric car doesn't come up to sports cars in terms of speed, but I'd rather have one that doesn't require gasoline.
7. To be increasingly successful, especially by advancing one's social status or financial situation. This definition is often used in the phrase "come up in the world." You will always reap the rewards of hard work, but you can truly come up by making connections and knowing the right people. After college, Lauren came up quickly in the world of medicine.
8. To increase in value. Luckily, housing prices in our neighborhood have come up since we bought our house.
See also: come, up

come up in the world

To be increasingly successful, especially by advancing one's social status or financial situation from where it stood before. You will always reap the rewards of hard work, but you can truly come up in the world by making connections and knowing the right people. After college, Lauren came up quickly in the world of medicine.
See also: come, up, world

come up in the world

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone has come up in the world, they are richer or more powerful than they used to be and have a higher social status. A polite and pleasant young man, he was said to have been an ordinary worker who had come up in the world. Note: You can also say that someone has gone up in the world or moved up in the world. This was the rich man's end of town; Jerrold must have gone up in the world to live here.
See also: come, up, world