come to the fore

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come to the fore

To be emphasized or made more noticeable. This argument needs to come to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Questions of corruption came to the fore after the auditors found discrepancies in the yearly budget report.
See also: come, fore

come to the fore

Fig. to become prominent; to become important. The question of salary has now come to the fore. Since his great successes as a prosecutor, he has really come to the fore in city politics.
See also: come, fore

be/come to the ˈfore

(British English) (American English be at the ˈfore) be or become important and noticed by people; play an important part: She came very much to the fore in the area during the local campaign against the new bypass.
Fore means ‘front’.
See also: come, fore
References in periodicals archive ?
Not Going Out BBC1, 9pm The tensions of sharing a weekend cottage with friends comes to the fore as Lee and Lucy spend three nights in the New Forest with Toby and Anna.
It is only when some people feel excluded economically that identity comes to the fore. Specifically, when a state does not bestow rights to some people, a feeling of discrimination will make way.
A scientist's worldview inescapably comes to the fore when discussing ethical matters.
it uses dance as a metaphor for personal liberty and freedom." That theme comes to the fore when Ren expresses his anger and frustration through an athletic, dramatic solo--but Kevin Bacon didn't quite know what he was getting himself into when he first auditioned for the film.
But while they can struggle for cohesion, the star quality of players such as Semi Radradra and Vereniki Goneva in their backline often comes to the fore, and the same can be said of lock LEONE NAKARAWA, who looks a worthwhile tryscorer bet at 19-4.
Thus, Vladimir Putin's visit will show that in the relations between Russia and Azerbaijan the economy comes to the fore.
We had to patch up with experience, in the hope it comes to the fore at the business end of the season."
Coconut water's delicate sweetness comes to the fore in this simple drink.
Until then, each time there is an election, the danger of entryism and, worse than that, a farcical result comes to the fore.
truth denying personality comes to the fore, rubbing up against various other group members, and clashing with her doctor (Barbara Marten, who is excellent in multiple roles).
Teenage angst comes to the fore with the "25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee." The musical will take to the stage at 7 p.m.
Although surfing can seem very glamorous, the hard physical work of it comes to the fore here.
Today, our shared heritage comes to the fore, as our hearts swell with pride to commemorate this pivotal milestone in our history.
But if it comes to the fore, they (oppositions) can go to court."
"The significance of the stadium really comes to the fore in the winter months - when you're down at Northampton on a Wednesday night, it's cold and it's miserable and you've got 1,600 people in the stadium.