come to terms

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come to terms

1. To agree to or do something, especially a set of demands or conditions. The government came to terms after the rebels' unflinching siege of the king's palace.
2. To begin to or make an effort to understand, accept, and deal with a difficult or problematic person, thing, or situation. I should have the report ready for you by this afternoon, I just need to come to terms with this new software update first. I've tried, but I just can't come to terms with Amy, she's totally out of control!
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come to terms

 (with someone or something)
1. to come to an agreement with someone. I finally came to terms with my lawyer about his fee. Bob, you have to come to terms with your father.
2. to learn to accept someone or something. She had to come to terms with the loss of her sight. She couldn't come to terms with her estranged husband.
See also: come, term

come to terms

(about someone or something) and come to terms (on someone or something) [for two or more people] to reach an accord on someone or something. Ed and Alice came to terms about money. They did not come to terms on the price.
See also: come, term

come to terms

1. Reach an agreement, as in The landlord and his tenants soon came to terms regarding repairs. [Early 1700s]
2. come to terms with. Reconcile oneself to, as in He'd been trying to come to terms with his early life. [Mid-1800s]
See also: come, term
References in periodicals archive ?
A riveting science fiction novel by a gifted author, Paul Black's The Tels is the story of a man's struggle as he comes to terms with his humanity and his destiny in a world that could well be upon us within a generation.
It is in the second section that she really comes to terms with the issue of vocation.
Without detailing the wild escapades that ensue, let me assure the reader that each of the family members comes to terms with his or her individual issues, in spirited and touching actions that affect other members of this disjointed clan.
Kantner takes his readers on an inspiring and eye-opening expedition from the arctic outback to the smog-filled city and back again as Cutuk comes to terms with the journey of living and our own true nature.
Here a 41-year-old called Martin comes to terms with a divorce and he enjoys getting rid of all the rubbish in his life.
Now, as the city comes to terms with the new economy, its centre is being revitalized, and the Millennium Point project at Digbeth, on the eastern side of the urban centre, is intended to help energize the process.
Fifteen years later: John Munn, proud and loyal patriarch of an East Coast hamlet, finally comes to terms with the closing of the local mine.