come to blows

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come to blows

To get into a fight, often physically. Shopping on Black Friday can be so frenetic and crazy that many customers nearly come to blows with one another!
See also: blow, come
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come to blows (over someone or something)

 and come to blows (about someone or something)
to reach the point of fighting about someone or something. Let's not come to blows over this silly disagreement.
See also: blow, come
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come to blows

Begin to fight. For example, It hardly seems worth coming to blows over a dollar! Thomas Hobbes had it in Leviathan (1651): "Their controversie must either come to blowes, or be undecided." This term is also put as fall to blows, especially in Britain. [Late 1500s]
See also: blow, come
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come to blows

COMMON If two people come to blows, they disagree so much about something that they start to fight. Two smartly-dressed women came to blows on a crowded commuter train yesterday, amazing onlookers. Local residents nearly came to blows over the proposal.
See also: blow, come
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

come to ˈblows (over something)

begin to hit each other: They were shouting at each other so much that I thought they would come to blows.
See also: blow, come
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

come to blows

To begin a physical fight.
See also: blow, come
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come to blows, to

To begin fighting, usually physically. “Their controversie must either come to blowes or be undecided,” wrote Thomas Hobbes in The Leviathan (1651). It also was sometimes put as “fall to blows,” as in Shakespeare’s HenryVI, Part 2, 2.3.
See also: come
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Jesse and Leah are still dithering, Tasha dumps Robbie and Duncan comes to blows with both Alf and Robbie.
Later,Darren comes to blows with Norman,and then has to be rescued by Dan when two heavies rough him up.
Everything spills out and finally comes to blows as the four prepare for a sunshine holiday in Tenerife, only for Janice to decide she can't live a lie any longer.
But it nearly comes to blows when Nikita Murray, 19, flings her non-alcoholic cocktail over 26-year-old Dave Behan, after being egged on by Natalie.
An exasperated Fiz comes to blows with Sally after misreading her relationship with John, and Sean insistence on involving lawyers in his quest for parental rights drives Violet and Jamie to look for their own place.
Jack comes to blows with Darren,but later apologises to his son as Ruth make a surprise return to Hollyoaks.
Zimbabwean flower expert Robbie Honey comes to blows with landscaper Gavin after he decides to clear the waste by pouring petrol on it and lighting a match (very stupid).