come down to

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come down to

1. To amount to something (usually the most important or crucial aspect of something). In this usage, "to" is typically followed by a thing or idea. It's a great offer, but my decision comes down to salary, to be honest with you. With rents skyrocketing, it all comes down to how much you want to keep living in this part of town.
2. To visit some place, often a location that is lower or farther south than one's starting point. In this usage, "to" is followed by a place. Our Canadian relatives are coming down to our house in California for a few days. Can you come down to the basement to help me for a second?
See also: come, down, to

come down to (some place)

To travel south of the state or area that one is currently in. If you ever want a break from those brutal Chicago winters, come down to Arizona and spend some time with us in the desert.
See also: come, down, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come down to something

to be reduced to something; to amount to no more than something. It comes down to whether you want to go to the movies or stay at home and watch television. It came down to either getting a job or going to college.
See also: come, down, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come down to

Also, come right down to. Amount to or be reduced to, as in It all comes down to a matter of who was first in line, or When it comes right down to it, you have to admit he was mistaken. [Late 1800s] Also see boil down, def. 2.
See also: come, down, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come down to

1. To confront or deal with forthrightly: When you come right down to it, you have to admit I'm correct.
2. To amount to in essence: It comes down to this: the man is a cheat.
See also: come, down, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Jarndyce, the only person up in the house, is just going to bed, rises from his book on hearing the rapid ringing at the bell, and comes down to the door in his dressing-gown.
"It's not about ability, it comes down to competing and being a bit clever.
The teams have scored and conceded the same number of goals, so if it's a draw it comes down to fair play.
Ahead of the final game, head coach Tracey Neville said: "It comes down to passion.
There, Wembley, in six days' time, after enough hassle and hype to floor Floyd and the Pac-Man, it comes down to a game of football.
"But it comes down to the mentality and the willingness to change a few aspects in his game.
has published It Comes Down to This: Leadership, Management and Getting There From Here by Chris Kaufman.
Sometimes it comes down to strategy, sometimes it comes down to more experience," he added.
You might be all that in your latest ' it' dress but when it comes down to the basics, it really comes down to the basics.
"It comes down to budgets at the end of the day," he said.
But judgment is what a literal reading of Leviticus 20:13 comes down to. She can't have it beth ways, "loving the sinner" while "hating the sin." Somehow I doubt that Hudson objects to eating shellfish or wearing clothes made from blended fabrics, beth of which are condemned right along with male homosexuality in Leviticus.
Washington insiders say one reason new Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson's popularity is soaring, both internationally and on Capitol Hill, comes down to one word--taxes.
Let's face it; if it comes down to a global split, Canada and the Church of England will be on the same side.
But when it comes down to it, they're typical junior high girls.
The cream of Edinburgh comes down to London for the annual season at the Lyric.