come down the pike

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come down the pike

To materialize; to happen or become prominent. "Pike" is short for "turnpike"—a main thoroughfare. You should take this job offer—who knows when another will come down the pike? That pitcher is the first young star to come down the pike for the team in many years.
See also: come, down, pike
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come down the pike

Appear, become prominent, as in He was the best writer to come down the pike in a long time. The noun pike here is short for "turnpike" or "road." [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: come, down, pike
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

come down the pike

AMERICAN
If something comes down the pike, it starts to happen or to become available. There may be some new treatments coming down the pike. They have threatened to block any legislation that comes down the pike, like family leave or a civil rights bill. Note: The reference here is to someone travelling along a turnpike (= road you have to pay to use).
See also: come, down, pike
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

come down the pike

appear on the scene; come to notice. North American
In this expression, a pike is short for ‘turnpike’, the American term for a motorway on which a toll is charged.
1983 Ed McClanahan The Natural Man He was, in a word, the most accomplished personage who'd yet come down the pike in all the days of Harry's ladhood.
See also: come, down, pike
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

come down the ˈpike

(American English, informal) happen; become noticeable: We’re hearing a lot about new inventions coming down the pike.
Pike here is short for ‘turnpike’, which is a type of large road in the US.
See also: come, down, pike
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

come down the pike

Slang
To come into prominence: "a policy ... allowing for little flexibility if an important new singer comes down the pike" (Christian Science Monitor).
See also: come, down, pike
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We're not supposed to be cheerleaders for every new thing that comes down the pike." The central question for Annas is, "What's the downside?"
So the interview does come to pass, in a health-food restaurant in New York City's East Village, and LaChapelle explains that he has not hired a publicist because he needs to be shielded from every tough question that comes down the pike. He's more interested in someone who can help him with damage control, the kind that was needed earlier this year when Mira Sorvino didn't like a photo LaChapelle took of her that appeared in Allure magazine.
We have learned that half the stuff that comes down the pike is agenda-driven, misleading, and often flat-out wrong.
Hypertext software allows tax advisers to store and retrieve files in a variety of formats (such as text, graphics, sound and videos, and whatever new comes down the pike).
And the fact that the plan is portable increases security; that element is going to be in whatever plan finally comes down the pike."
If something comes down the pike that looks as though it would represent a good opportunity for us, we would not be bashful about taking advantage of it."
An absolutely insane aural assault comes down the pike in the form of the Mozart 7" Nasty.