come close

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come close

1. To physically move towards someone or something. Come close, kids, so you can see better.
2. To nearly or almost do something. We came close to hitting that car, but luckily, it swerved out of our way at the last second.
3. To be similar to someone or something else, often in a particular way. Oh, your replacement doesn't even come close to you—she's totally disorganized, and bossy too. Megan's a genius, so no other student at school comes close to her.
See also: close, come
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

come close

 (to someone or something)
1. Lit. to approach very near to someone or something. Come close to me and keep me warm. I didn't touch it, but I really came close that time.
2. Fig. to approximate someone or something in a specific quality. When it comes to kindness, you don't even come close to Jane. You don't come close to the former owners in caring for your property.
See also: close, come
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

come ˈclose (to something/to doing something)

almost reach or do something: He’d come close to death.We didn’t win but we came close.
See also: close, come
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
No other foreign policy analyst even comes close to Golitsyn's level of accuracy and depth of analysis.
And, while the author admits that this work is not the final answer to issues within the realm of human communication, deception, and personality, it comes close. In fact, Walters, a true student of human behavior who possesses practical experience in interviewing, has produced a work that approximates the ideal of what an interview book should be about.
I can't think of any one musical endeavor that even comes close.
Nothing else comes close. Does this mean that spot welding has been eliminated from the Golf?
PA9T provides an excellent fuel barrier that exceeds the performance of nylons 6 and 12 by a factor of 10 and comes close to levels for ETFE fluoropolymer.
To his credit, he concedes that "the overall flavor of the elite media reporting favors gun control, campaign finance reform, gay rights, and the environmental movement," though he doesn't find the bias "as overwhelming as some conservative critics do" Alterman also comes close to admitting that the media are hypersensitive about race, and points Out that more often than not they choose not to cover racial issues at all, leaving (according to one survey) somewhere between 40 to 60 percent of all whites in America with the misapprehension that the average black American fares as well as the average white American in employment, income, education, and access to health care.
Goldsmith comes close to saying what he means, but that the truth eludes.
IN OPERA there is no-one in Wales who comes close to bass baritone Bryn Terfel.
Williams comes close to that balance in only a few pieces: "1987" and "Our Father."
This exercise doesn't quite substantiate my sense that every other book or article published on an early modern topic over the last ten years has been about either "the body," or "the self," but it comes close to doing so.
It will speak this year as it has done now for 20 centuries especially to those whose need is great, who don't want visitors asking how they are but the real friendship that comes close enough to know how you are without asking and to be affected by all that is affecting you.
It is not because significant quantities remain behind, but because our laboratory equipment comes close to detecting concentrations as small as parts per quadrillion.
The book comes close to providing a manifesto for practical anarchism, or a manual for the working out of chaos theory through the articulation of underlying patterns beneath an infinitely complex array of surface phenomena.
When your positively-charged hand comes close enough to the metal, the negatively-charged electrons will leap across the air.
One reason has to do with the contrary movements of Wiegman's final chapter, in which she comes close to arguing that we must not reinscribe black women into the modern economy of visibility, then comes close to acknowledging that this argument entails the position that we need not concern ourselves with whether black women occupy positions of power (whether in university faculties, corporate boardrooms, or elected offices), then tacks back and argues that "I am not saying that the project of reconstructing Western knowledges about minoritized people is not an important, indeed vital, aspect of cultural struggle," before concluding the book with a reading of Uncle Tom's Cabin.