come

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Related to comes: COMEX

come

and cum
1. in. to experience an orgasm. (There is no other single word for this meaning. Usually objectionable.) God, I thought she’d never cum.
2. n. semen. (Usually objectionable.) Do you think cum is alive?

come

/become unstuck
To break down or fall apart: a marriage that came unstuck after only a year.
See:
12
References in periodicals archive ?
Linoleum is water, child, and animal resistant, and comes in an astonishing variety of swirly, marbled and simple colors.
When push comes to shove, she's the one with the charge card--and she's the one who's in charge
Then they come back to the PCU and teach the Sailors here what to expect.
Many scientists have thought that much of the ocean's dissolved iron comes from dust blowing off the continents, notes Gabriel M.
Soon as 5 starts his dribble, 3 comes hard for the ball - selling himself by yelling 5's name or the word "Ball
Where it comes from: Live oak is increasingly difficult to find in the sizes required for Old Ironsides, but trees have come from the wake of Hurricane Hugo in Charleston, South Carolina; as a result of land cleared for construction throughout the Southeast; and as a donation from a forest-products company.
The man comes out of my aunt's room with no shirt on and speaks to everyone.
Comes with 3 exclusive animation disks which can be viewed with the alien viewer shaped like a microscope (SRP $29.
1 comes with a non-removable Li-Po 6800 mAh battery, which allows users music play of about 140 hours.
HOLD THAT HEAVY MATTRESS: When it comes to beds, comfort is king these days.
Strautmann's Brikettierpresse comes in three sizes.
A gift of pounds 50 comes 'in memory of Reg Hammond, February 11, 1981, a dear husband, father and grandfather who is always in the thoughts of his family'.
My Water Comes From The Mountains is an educational picture book by Tiffany Fourment that teaches young readers about the natural cycle of water.
The quintessential Canadian moment comes when Phil is drunkenly hobbling through the woods and the familiar synthesizer of Rush's "Tom Sawyer" breaks in loud.