comeback


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

come back

1. verb To return to someone or something (often a place or situation). We're coming back from our vacation on Tuesday. Our dog Sparky was missing for days, but he came back home last night, thank goodness. I'd like to come back to a point you made earlier.
2. verb A call for someone or an animal to return to one. Sparky, come back!
3. verb To return to one's memory. The name of the song will come back to me, just give me a minute. OK, it's all coming back to me now—you were sitting over there, and you definitely asked that question.
4. verb To reply to something, often in a snarky or irritable way. I don't like Mary that much. Whenever I talk to her, she always manages to come back with something insulting. When you asked him about tomorrow's meeting, what did he come back with?
5. verb To return to a former state of functionality, popularity, success, etc. Oh, that's a career-ending knee injury for sure—there's no way he's coming back from that. I bought bell-bottoms because '70s fashions are coming back in style.
6. verb To overcome a deficit in a sport, game, or contest. After being down five goals, they came back and tied the game.
7. noun The overcoming of a deficit in a sport, game, or contest. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. After being down five goals, they made a huge comeback and tied the game.
8. noun A return to someone or something's former state of functionality, popularity, success, etc. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. Oh, that's a career-ending knee injury for sure—there's no way he'll make a comeback from that. I bought bell-bottoms because '70s fashions are making a real comeback.
9. noun A rejoinder, often one that is (or tries to be) clever or snarky. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. "Your mom" is the lamest comeback you could possibly use.
See also: back, come

come back

to return; to return to an advantageous or favorable state or condition. Walter practiced every day, hoping to come back from his injury. When will the good old days come back?
See also: back, come

come back (to someone or something)

to return to someone or something. Please come back to me. I'm lonely. Come back to your home!
See also: back, come

come back

(to someone) [for a memory] to return to someone's consciousness. Everything you said suddenly came back to me. All the old memories came back to me and made me feel very sad.
See also: back, come

come back (to someone or something)

to return to someone or something. Please come back to me. I'm lonely. Come back to your home!
See also: back, come

make a comeback

to return to one's former (successful) career. After ten years in retirement, the singer made a comeback. You're never too old to make a comeback.
See also: comeback, make

come back

1. Return to or regain past success or popularity, as in It's hard to come back from two sets down and win the match, or Long hemlines are coming back this fall. [Early 1900s]
2. Return to one's mind, as in Her name came back to me after I saw her picture. [Late 1800s]
3. Retort or reply; also, retaliate. For example, No matter how many insults he flings, I can always come back with another. [Late 1800s]
See also: back, come

make a comeback

Also, stage a comeback. Achieve a success after retirement or failure, as in After years in mediocre movies, she made a comeback on Broadway, or The humble hamburger is about to stage a comeback. [Colloquial; c. 1920] Also see come back, def. 1.
See also: comeback, make

come back

v.
1. To return to some place: I came back to Montana last year. I hope my dog comes back.
2. To become present again: That unpleasant feeling came back to me when I found out they were lying again.
3. To begin to be remembered; recur to the memory: What happened last night is coming back to me now.
4. To return to or regain past success after a period of misfortune: After years of living in obscurity, the rock singer came back more popular than ever.
5. come back with To retort; reply: She came back with a clever answer that subtly insulted him.
See also: back, come
References in periodicals archive ?
IAN: I have a problem with band comebacks due to the motives behind them most of the pop groups are cash related
His music was great in his heyday and he''s made comebacks in films.
They announced they were making a comeback last year.
THERE are comebacks - and then there are comebacks such as Frank Olivares' recent return to the saddle.
Jason Fife just wanted to get it all out of the way - the first close game, and the first fourth-quarter comeback, and all the questions that come with them.
Kevin Lygo, Channel 5 director of programmes, has said: "He is one of the most original on and off-screen talents British broadcasting has produced and the fact he's chosen us for his comeback demonstrates the strides the channel is taking.
Run said no one should think of this as a comeback album.
Latin America's largest corporations make a comeback in 2000 and 2001, with Embraer, P[[tilde]{a}]o de Ac[acute{u}]car and Sadia leading the way.
The nearly extinct cats aren't out of the woods yet, but they're making a comeback.
For three merry days in September, our stuffy egocentric golfers transformed themselves into a wild and crazy bunch of red-blooded, smashmouth team athletes who mounted the greatest comeback victory ever witnessed by man, beast, or golfer.
Since a significant portion of their revenues come from overseas, many of these companies will have an even stronger comeback when foreign economies improve.
In June 1993 Ann Landers ran a letter from a reader who had recently seen an article "about how LSD is making a big comeback among the youth of America" - the kind of story that has appeared in newspapers and magazines with some regularity during the past few years.
Their antics yield the liveliest passages in Comeback.
Liza's stuck in the time warp of the fabulous comeback, but she has never gone away.
Tompkins' Executive Briefing Shows How to Create Comeback Plan and Excel after Recession